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dc.contributor.advisorSilvern, Stevenen_US
dc.contributor.authorHurst-McDonald, Alice
dc.creatorHurst-McDonald, Aliceen_US
dc.date2021-11-24T14:05:39.000en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-29T11:34:16Z
dc.date.available2021-11-29T11:34:16Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-01en_US
dc.date.submitted2021-08-31T11:13:14-07:00en_US
dc.identifierhonors_theses/331en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13013/814en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is an investigation into the link between settler-colonialism, capitalism, environmental degradation, and the corresponding modern conditions of the Navajo Nation and its people - the Dine. This thesis uses existing History, Geography, and Indigenous Studies academic scholarship, as well as new research to connect the processes of settler-colonialism and capitalism to Indigenous federal policies within the United States. The United States' settler-colonial political and economic systems have facilitated the destruction of Indigenous sovereignty and installation of extractive energy projects, such as uranium and coal on the Navajo Nation. These policies and industries have created a legacy of dire socio-economic conditions and damage to the land and culture of the Dine people residing in the Navajo Nation. However, this is not a narrative of defeat. Recently, The Navajo Nation's undertaking of multiple renewable energy proposals and projects points towards not only an energy transformation, but a revival of tribal sovereignty and Dine culture for the Dine of today and for generations to come.en_US
dc.titleA Green Future In The desert: A Navajo Energy Transformationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.legacy.pubstatuspublisheden_US
dc.description.departmentInterdisciplinary Studiesen_US
dc.type.degreeBachelor of Arts (BA)en_US
dc.legacy.pubtitleHonors Thesesen_US
dc.legacy.identifierhttps://digitalcommons.salemstate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1331&context=honors_theses&unstamped=1en_US
dc.legacy.identifieritemhttps://digitalcommons.salemstate.edu/honors_theses/331en_US
dc.legacy.identifierfilehttps://digitalcommons.salemstate.edu/context/honors_theses/article/1331/type/native/viewcontenten_US
dc.subject.keywordDineen_US
dc.subject.keywordNavajoen_US
dc.subject.keywordrenewable energyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsettler-colonialismen_US
dc.subject.keywordsovereigntyen_US


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