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dc.contributor.advisorLeong, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Martin Francis
dc.creatorNelson, Martin Francisen_US
dc.date2021-11-24T14:05:38.000en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-29T11:34:09Z
dc.date.available2021-11-29T11:34:09Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-17en_US
dc.date.submitted2014-07-11T12:15:40-07:00en_US
dc.identifierhonors_theses/31en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13013/790en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study uses survey method in a state college in Massachusetts to gauge whether or not a relationship exists between frequency of video game playing and levels of misogyny. A survey was administered to ~100 students, male and female, to discern frequency of video game playing and levels of misogyny. A literature review revealed that video game playing does result in negative feelings towards women in women, as well as men. Literatures also indicate that representation of women in video games is troublesome as well. The study did not find significance in its hypothesis, but still dug into a fairly new avenue of media and ideas on gender.en_US
dc.titleVideo Games and Misogyny: Understanding the Relationshipen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.legacy.pubstatuspublisheden_US
dc.description.departmentSociologyen_US
dc.date.displayMay-14en_US
dc.type.degreeBachelor of Arts (BA)en_US
dc.legacy.pubtitleHonors Thesesen_US
dc.legacy.identifierhttps://digitalcommons.salemstate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1026&context=honors_theses&unstamped=1en_US
dc.legacy.identifieritemhttps://digitalcommons.salemstate.edu/honors_theses/31en_US
dc.subject.keywordgenderen_US
dc.subject.keywordsociologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordvideo gamesen_US
dc.subject.keywordmisogynyen_US


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