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dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Sara B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, L. Virginia
dc.creatorMartinez, L. Virginiaen_US
dc.date2021-11-24T14:05:38.000en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-29T11:33:23Z
dc.date.available2021-11-29T11:33:23Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-01en_US
dc.date.submitted2020-08-04T10:54:03-07:00en_US
dc.identifierhonors_theses/302en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13013/782en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this research is to examine racial disparities among college-age African American and Latina women with a focus on menstrual health issues and their experiences with health care. This research includes a literature review that explores the existence of institutionalized racism and sexism in medicine, giving attention to reproductive justice and ultimately menstrual justice for women of color. It also entails four semi-structured, in-depth interviews with African American and Latina women, through which I identified four common themes: 1) the normalization of pain, symptoms, and experiences, 2) feelings of not being taken seriously by medical providers, 3) the disruption of daily activities and self-image, and 4) feelings of frustration that treatments are not working. Previous research supports the findings that women of color are disproportionately disadvantaged compared to their White counterparts in terms of birth outcomes and infant mortality, quality of medical care, and their relationship with medical professionals. Although the area of menstrual justice is particularly understudied, this research sheds light on the experiences of women of color who have sought medical care for menstrual health conditions in the hopes that their health care experiences will not go unnoticed or be dismissed. Medical professionals can draw on this study to address the problem of racial disparities in medical treatment, menstrual health, and health care in general to provide a meaningful and effective path for women of color.en_US
dc.titleRacial Injustices: The Menstrual Health Experiences of African American and Latina Womenen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.legacy.pubstatuspublisheden_US
dc.description.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.date.displayMay-20en_US
dc.type.degreeBachelor of Science (BS)en_US
dc.legacy.pubtitleHonors Thesesen_US
dc.legacy.identifierhttps://digitalcommons.salemstate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1302&context=honors_theses&unstamped=1en_US
dc.legacy.identifieritemhttps://digitalcommons.salemstate.edu/honors_theses/302en_US
dc.legacy.identifierfilehttps://digitalcommons.salemstate.edu/context/honors_theses/article/1302/type/native/viewcontenten_US
dc.subject.keywordhealth careen_US
dc.subject.keywordinstitutionalized racismen_US
dc.subject.keywordmedical careen_US
dc.subject.keywordmenstrual healthen_US
dc.subject.keywordracial disparitiesen_US


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