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dc.contributor.advisorAparicio, Carlosen_US
dc.contributor.authorLilja, Shannon
dc.creatorLilja, Shannonen_US
dc.date2021-11-24T14:05:38.000en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-29T11:33:23Z
dc.date.available2021-11-29T11:33:23Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-01en_US
dc.date.submitted2020-08-04T10:54:03-07:00en_US
dc.identifierhonors_theses/300en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13013/780en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo nonhuman animal models of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), the Spontaneously Hypertensive rat (SHR) and Lewis (LEW) rats, were used to explore the possibility that schedule-induced polydipsia is a predictor of cognitive impulsivity. A concurrent-chains procedure consisting of 60 choice cycles was used. Each cycle began with one response on the back lever causing two front levers to extend into the experimental chamber. Choice was measured in the initial link with the levers using Random Interval schedules arranging entries to two terminal links. In one terminal link, the left lever produced one food pellet immediately (SSF). In the other terminal link, the right lever produced 4 food pellets (LLF) after a delay of 0.1, 5, 10, 20, 40 or 80 seconds. A bottle of water could be available (B), or could not be (A) available, to the rats in the choice situation according to an ABABA design. The results showed that the rats discounted the value of the LLF as a function of the delay to deliver it. Both strains of rats drank water during the one-minute blackout following 10 choice cycles during the session. But the SHRs drank more water than the LEWs, especially during the delays to the LLF. A negative correlation between polydipsia and discounting rate suggests that: (1) polydipsia is not a predictor of impulsive choice, and (2) polydipsia is not related to motor impulsivity.en_US
dc.titleIs Polydipsia a Predictor of Cognitive Impulsivity?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.legacy.pubstatuspublisheden_US
dc.description.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.date.displayMay 2020en_US
dc.type.degreeBachelor of Science (BS)en_US
dc.legacy.pubtitleHonors Thesesen_US
dc.legacy.identifierhttps://digitalcommons.salemstate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1300&context=honors_theses&unstamped=1en_US
dc.legacy.identifieritemhttps://digitalcommons.salemstate.edu/honors_theses/300en_US
dc.subject.keywordADHDen_US
dc.subject.keywordcognitive impulsivityen_US
dc.subject.keywordconcurrent-chains procedureen_US
dc.subject.keyworddelay discountingen_US
dc.subject.keywordpolydipsiaen_US


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