• Residence of C. H. Bond, Cliftondale, Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      Charles Henry Bond, born in Saugus in 1846, made his fortune as the president of Waitt & Bond, Inc., a cigar manufacturing company. Once he had amassed a sizeable fortune, Bond became less interested in cigars and devoted more of his time to his one true passion: music. He sought out poor but talented singers and would fund their European training, even giving them monthly living stipends. Bond invested in the construction of what was to be the Lyric Theatre in Boston. Unfortunately Bond took a financial hit after the Panic of 1907. He tried to ignore the trouble and continued to accrue debt in order to keep funding the Lyric Theatre project. In May of 1908, Bond was kicked off of the project. In July of the same year he was found dead in his bathtub. He left a signed note that read, “I have been killed by my friends and enemies. It is more than I can bear. I can stand it no longer. My heart is broken. I leave everything to my wife.” The Lyric Theatre project was bought by the Shubert Organization, which opened it under the name the Shubert Theatre in 1910.
    • Residence of Francis H. Appleton, Peabody, Mass.

      1884-01-01
      Francis H. Appleton was born on 17 June 1847 to a family heavily involved in government, both of his grandfathers having been members of Congress. Appleton attended preparatory schools and studied with a private tutor in order to prepare him for college. He graduated from Harvard in 1869 and went on to attend the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, but remained there for only a short time. After leaving M.I.T. Appleton decided that he would try his hand at farming, a decision made largely in hopes of improving his poor health by means of fresh air. In 1871 Harvard opened the Agricultural Department, and so, desiring formal training in his latest pursuit, Appleton enrolled as a student in the Bussey Institute. While studying at the Bussey Institute, he also bought an estate in Peabody where he was able to put his training to practical use. Appleton chose farming as his primary occupation, although he had financial interests in many other enterprises and managed his investments by himself. He served as director, president, trustee, secretary, librarian, etc. for countless institutions and also held memberships at an astounding number of clubs.
    • Residence of G.W.W. Dove. Andover, Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      George William Webster Dove was the son of John Dove, who co-founded the Smith & Dove Mfg. Co. Dove attended Phillips Academy and the Lawrence Scientific School at Harvard. When the Civil War began, he helped organize a local regiment. He enlisted in the Navy where he was a Third Assistant Engineer on the U.S.S. Richmond. After the war ended, he returned home to help run the family business. Dove was involved in the finances of several Boston trading firms. In 1889, one of these firms (the Pacific Guano Company) failed due in part to purported fraud by J.M. Glidden, who was likely Dove's brother-in-law. This scandal prompted Dove to retire, but his removal from the business world was far from relaxing. During the summer of 1894, he went on an expedition to Greenland, which went so awry that a ship was lost and the entire group had to return to Massachusetts on a fishing schooner. Dove and his wife, Susan C. Glidden, had four children. He died in Andover at the age of 73.
    • Residence of George Peabody, Washington Sq. Salem.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      George Peabody was a financier and a philanthropist who donated millions of dollars to charity. He was known throughout the world for his generosity and modesty. He was born in Peabody, Massachusetts, and even after he moved away from there, he continued to give money so freely to his hometown that a group of Peabody citizens held a banquet on the eve of his birthday each year. He lived for many years in England, where his philanthropy continued. He was the American darling of the British. Queen Victoria was fond of him and gave him a portrait of herself. He died in England and, though he had made it clear he wanted to be buried in Peabody, he was still given a funeral service in England at Westminster Abbey. His body was then sailed home where it was met with great reverence. Throngs of people came to see the casket, numbering in the tens of thousands. He was buried at a plot he had picked out, in a tomb where he had already laid his mother to rest.
    • Residence of H. A. Pevear

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      Henry Augustus Pevear, born on 12 September 1828, was a leader in the morocco manufacturing business. Originally based out of Lynn, Pevear and his brother, George, were manufacturing morocco before Henry was nineteen years old. Their business became so successful that they took an office in Boston and eventually opened both a manufacturing house and a store in Peru. After a long and financially rewarding career in morocco manufacturing, Pevear retired from the business, only to devote his time to a new business endeavor: the electric light. For the next decade, Pevear was the president of the Electric Light Company of Lynn, which he grew into a powerful company. When he eventually retired from this business, he had merged it with the Edison Standard Electric Company, creating the industrial giant, General Electric. After his official retirement, Pevear set about humanitarian work. He worked with a group of men to found the Stetson Home for boys. He also gave his summer home to the Boston Baptist Social Union to use as the Mary Anna Home, a place for “weary mothers and their children.” Pevear died in 1909.
    • Residence of Hon. John I. Baker, Beverly, Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      Hon. John I. Baker was the first mayor of Beverly. Having been born there on 16 August 1812, Baker devoted himself to improving Beverly. He was interested in the idea of temperance (he was nominated for Congress and Governor on the Prohibition ticket) and was strongly against slavery. For seventeen years he served as town clerk and selectman. He was county commissioner for sixteen years, school committeeman for twenty years, and he was in the House of Representatives for eighteen years. He also served in the state senate for two years. The list of his public service extends further still, having served on a variety of commissions. He lived to be eighty-three, and was well known and loved by the citizens of Beverly when he died.
    • Residence of Hon. William A. Russell. Lawrence, Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      William Augustus Russell was born in Vermont on 22 April 1831. In 1852 he started manufacturing paper in Exeter, New Hampshire. That same year he moved to Lawrence, Massachusetts and continued to manufacture paper. He entered into a life of politics in 1869 when he became a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1869. For the next sixteen years he remained embroiled in the country’s politics, finally ending his political career with six years in Congress. After leaving Congress he returned to the manufacture of paper. In Boston, during the winter of 1899, Russell died.
    • Residence of J. B. Smith, Andover Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      James B. Smith was the son of Peter Smith, one of the founders of Smith & Dove Mfg. Co.
    • Residence of J. T. Wilson, Nahant, Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      Joseph T. Wilson was well known as a building contractor who constructed some of the finest mansions on the North Shore, including that of Henry Clay Frick at Prides Crossing. However, Wilson was more than a builder. Originally from Maine, Wilson eventually made Nahant his home, holding more public office positions than seemed humanly possible. He was the chairman of the school board for twenty years, a trustee of the public library for twenty-five years, and a well respected judge. He was a member of the boards of selectmen, assessors, and health for thirty years and chaired those boards for 29 of those years. Supposedly he was up for election to public office more than a hundred times and was never defeated, all the while never soliciting votes for himself. It was long rumored that he was instrumental in securing the party nomination and ultimate Senate victory for Henry Cabot Lodge, a longtime friend of Wilson’s. Wilson was a 33rd degree Mason. He and his wife, Sophlia, who was also from Maine, had three children. His son entered into the contracting business and became a partner of the company which was renamed J.T. Wilson & Son.
    • Residence of J.E. Spring, Corner of Sumner St. & Spring Ave., Danvers, Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      Jacob E. Spring, a native of Maine, was born in 1833. At the age of twelve he moved to Buenos Aires where his family was raising sheep. They would ship hides back to the United States, and in exchange, relatives would ship lumber down to Argentina. While in Buenos Aires, Spring met and married a young woman from Pennsylvania; they had seven children. In 1872 he bought property in Danvers, Massachusetts and moved his entire family there with the exception of his two eldest daughters, who were in school in Germany. He eventually built Porphyry Hall, a magnificent stone mansion made of over forty different types of stone in a range of colors. This effect proved impressive. Spring was a successful wool merchant, but it is thought that he lost his fortune when some of his ships were wrecked off the coast of South America. The Xaverian Brothers bought Porphyry Hall where they founded St. John’s Normal College, which became St. John’s Preparatory School in 1907. The school has since expanded, adding many buildings to the campus, but Porphyry Hall remains standing and is used as the Administration Building.
    • Residence of Joseph Davis, Lynn, Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
    • Residence of Mrs. E. D. Kimball, Washington Sq. Salem.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      Edward D. Kimball was a merchant and a ship owner whose vessels could be found all over the world, from the west coast of Africa to the East Indies. He married his cousin, Susan Sawyer Kimball. They had three sons and one adopted daughter. Edward Kimball died in Paris in 1867. Susan continued to live a quiet life. She was a charitable woman who was known for her sympathetic nature. She died in 1902.
    • Residence of Mrs. Eliza Sutton. Main St., Peabody, Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      Eliza Dustin Sutton of Peabody believed strongly in using her wealth to help others. She established the Charitable Tenement Association, which provided housing for poor, elderly women in Peabody. It still stands today as the Sutton Home for Women. She donated $20,000 to the Peabody Institute to build the Eben Dale Sutton Reference room, named for her son, who had suffered from a variety of maladies and died at age fourteen. The Eben Dale Sutton Reference Room has recently been restored and it continues to house the archives for the Peabody Institute Library. George Peabody was a good friend and stayed with Eliza and her husband when he returned to visit Peabody in 1856, 1857, and 1866.
    • Residence of Wm. Blaney. Stevens St., Peabody, Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      William Blaney, a master painter, was born in Lynn on 17 December 1834 to Philip and Mary Blaney. Philip was also a painter, and William started in the business when he was still a boy. He moved to Peabody and established himself there as a painter as well as a leader in town affairs, although he never held an official position. One night, at the age of seventy-nine, Blaney was walking through Peabody by the Soldiers’ Monument when he was struck by a car. The driver of the car, H.J. Pushard, took Blaney to the hospital where they thought he had sustained only minor injuries. In fact, his skull had been fractured, and he died the following afternoon, 15 November 1913.
    • Shoe Factory of V.K. & A.H. Jones. 120 Broad St., Lynn, Mass. Erected 1883.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      V.K. & A. H. Jones Shoe Factory manufactured fine ladies’ shoes and boots. They were known for hiring only the most skilled people in the trade and as a result their products were highly sought after. Despite their popularity, they only concerned themselves with the New England and Western trade. They had a factory in Hampton, New Hampshire but closed it down when they consolidated their business in Lynn, causing an economic collapse in Hampton.
    • Smith & Dove Mfg. Co., Andover Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      Founded by John and Peter Smith and John Dove, all from Brechin, Scotland, Smith & Dove Mfg. Co. dealt primarily in flax yarn. John Smith first came to America when he was fourteen in 1816. Years later, he asked his younger brother Peter to join him. Peter brought along a friend, John Dove. Both John Dove and Peter had worked in the flax mill of Dove’s father back in Scotland so they brought with them knowledge about, and zeal for, flax products. Although initially people were reluctant to buy a newer product from such a new company, the integrity, fine product, and pleasant dispositions of the three founders won the public over. The business began in Frye Village in Andover, but was then moved to Abbot Village in the same town.
    • State Normal School. Salem, Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      Horace Mann believed that the American public school system needed serious attention in order to function well. One of the biggest problems Mann observed with the public schools was that the teachers were often no more educated than their pupils. And so the Salem Normal School was born, a place to teach young women how to teach. The school opened in 1854. Demand for teachers increased nationwide and demand for admission to the Salem Normal School increased as a result. The campus, in addition to the student body, began to expand. In 1898, the school became coeducational, but it wasn’t until the creation of a commercial program in 1908 that male enrollment started to spike. By 1921 the school had switched from a two year college to a four year college, and just eleven years later the name was changed from the Salem Normal School to Salem Teachers College. New programs were added, new buildings were constructed, and finally it became a residential school, with the first residence halls opening in 1966. It was renamed again in 1968, this time to Salem State College. As nursing and business administration programs were added, new property was purchased, and the college expanded to include four campuses. In 2010 the school was renamed once more, earning the title of Salem State University.
    • Stevens Block, Lynn Mass.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
    • Summer Residence of Henry W. Peabody, Lighthouse Point, Beverly.

      Geo. H. Walker & Co. (1884-01-01)
      Henry W. Peabody, born in Salem on 22 August 1838, began his life in business at Williams & Hall, China and Indian merchants. He worked in the counting room there, and three years after he moved on to be a clerk at Samuel Stevens & Co. After three years in that position he became a member of the firm. Although Samuel Stevens & Company had established a large trade with India, Africa, and Australia, and seemed to be moving in a prosperous direction, the success of the company declined steadily over the next three years. By 1866 Peabody had retired, having lost most of the money he had made thus far. By 1867 he had started his own trade business, Henry W. Peabody and Company, with offices in New York City, Yucatan, London, and Sydney. This business did very well and Peabody was heavily involved in all aspects of his company. After Peabody had died, President Taft leased his estate as the summer capital. The widow who owned the estate Taft originally leased grew tired of the constant media attention and tourist traffic on her property, and therefore refused to renew the lease. Lucy W. Peabody, Henry’s widow, agreed to let Taft use her home for the second half of his term.