Recent Submissions

  • Students Writing Vocabulary Words on the Blackboard

    Merrill, E.G. (1904-01-01)
    "Constant reviews in which one word is made to suggest many others having the same root, enable the children to retain the vocabulary which must increase so rapidly in this grade. [Photo caption located on the back-side of the photo]
  • Students Drawing on Blackboard

    Merrill, E.G. (1904-01-01)
    "The children are given a chance to draw the pictures suggested by some of their stories and poems." [Photo caption located on the back-side of the photo]
  • Students Reading From "Gods and Heroes"

    Merrill, E.G. (1904-01-01)
    "When reading "Gods and Heroes" the class is taken to the main hall to study the statues." [Photo caption located on the back side of the picture]
  • Fifth Grade Students Doing Breathing Exercises in Class

    Merrill, E.G. (1904-01-01)
    "This shows Grade V taking breathing exercises before their reading lesson." [Photo caption located on the back-side of the picture]
  • Students Reading From "Seven Little Sisters"

    Merrill, E.G. (1904-01-01)
    " The different pictures in the buildings are used to illustrate the reading when advisable. In this case the class is reading the story of Gemila in "Seven Little Sisters". [Photo caption located on the back side of the picture]
  • Second Grade Students Reading Aloud

    Merrill, E.G. (1904-01-01)
    "The children in the second grade read "Little People of Other Lands" At one time a little Japanese girl was a member of this class." [Photo caption located on the back of the picture] The Training School was located on the first floor of the Sullivan Building.
  • Little Red Riding Hood

    1904-01-01
    "The story of Red Riding Hood can be made much more realistic by an illustration of this sort." [Photo caption located on the back side of the picture] Theater was an important part of the Training School curriculum. The Training School was located on the first floor of the Sullivan Building.
  • Student Dressed as an Eskimo

    Merrill, E.G. (1904-01-01)
    "When reading about the Eskimos this little boy was dressed to represent Sipsu. The Arctic scene shown here was drawn upon the blackboard." [Photo caption located on the back-side of the photo]
  • Alice in Wonderland

    Merrill, E.G. (1904-01-01)
    "Occasional dramatization is an aid to good expression in reading. These photographs show three scenes from "Alice in Wonderland" as given in "Child Life", Book IV. "No room! No room! they cried out when they saw Alice coming." [Photo caption located on the back of the picture] The Training School was located on the first floor of the Sullivan Building.
  • Mary Edwina Harris

    Bousley & Moulton (1874-01-01)
    Mary Edwina Harris "Winnie" was a member of Class 37 from Freetown. She entered on August 30, 1872 and graduated on July 7,1874. She taught in Leadville, Colorado, which was one of the world's largest silver camps at the time. It was also home to outlaw Doc Holliday and was the scene of a major mining strike in the 1890s. Winnie married William Thompson of Leadville, Colorado.
  • Lucy Ellen Moten

    Smith & Bousley (1875-01-01)
    According to Notable Black American Women, "Lucy Ellen Moten's strong influence as an educator of black school teachers changed Washington D.C.'s entire educational system." Moten was born in 1851 to free black parents in Virginia. They moved to Washington D.C. for better educational opportunities for her. She started out in Howard University's normal department before transferring to Salem Normal School in 1873. She graduated in 1875 and taught in schools before taking the position of principal at Miner Normal School, a training school for black elementary teachers. In 1894, she began study at the Howard University Medical School, where she received her M.D. in 1897. She then expanded Miner's curriculum to include coursework on health and hygiene. Miner's graduates were sought by state superintendents throughout the country. Moten left Miner in 1920; it is now part of the University of District Columbia. She died in 1933. There is a Washington, D.C. elementary school that bears her name.
  • Daniel Barnard Hagar

    Taylor & Preston (1890-01-01)
    Daniel Barnard Hagar was the Principal of the Salem Normal School from 1865-1896. Hagar, the third principal of Salem Normal School, was born in Newton Lower Falls, Massachusetts, on April 22, 1820. Hagar was graduated from Union College in 1843 as valedictorian of his class and as a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Prior to his appointment to Salem Normal, Hagar was principal of Canajoharie Academy, superintendent of schools in New York state, principal of Norwich Academy, and headmaster of Eliot High School in Jamaica Plain. He also served as president of the Massachusetts Teachers Association, and co-founded the National Teachers Association, which became the National Education Association while he was president of the organization. Many changes occurred during Hagar's tenure as principal of Salem Normal School. The school expanded and renovated its building on Broad Street in 1871 because of increasing enrollment. The curriculum grew, with more emphasis given to psychology, music, drawing, calisthenics, and industrial arts. Hagar also developed the idea of a training school for Salem Normal students, but he would not live to see the completion of the new school building he planned, which would devote the entire first floor to a model school. Dr. Hagar died in Sharon, Massachusetts, on July 4, 1896.
  • The Salem Normal School Class of 1886

    Alden, A.E. (1886-01-01)
    Group portrait of the SNS Class of 1886 standing at the entrance to the school building.
  • Salem Normal School Faculty, 1880s

    Alden, A.E. (2015-03-18)
    The faculty of the Salem Normal School in the 1880s. Photo includes Principal Daniel Hagar, Ellen Dodge, Mary Godden, Mary Plumer, Elizabeth Jones, Harriet Martin, Adelaide Towle, Lizzie Herrick, Caroline Cole, Sophia Driver, and Chase Palmer.
  • Salem Normal School Building, 1854-1871

    Proctor, G.K. (2015-03-18)
    The original Salem Normal School building at Broad and Summer Streets.
  • The Year Book

    Salem Normal School (Salem Normal School, 1919-01-01)
    The yearbook of the Class of 1919. The book includes a letter from Sumner Webster Cushing, a faculty member who served in the war, as well as a roll of honor of students, faculty, and alumni who served. For the first time, there are candid photographs of students, as well as photographs of members of clubs, and a photograph and dedication to faculty member Harriet Laura Martin.
  • The Year Book

    Salem Normal School (Salem Normal School, 1918-01-01)
    The yearbook of the Class of 1918. For the first time, the book includes photographs and information about each graduating senior divided by their course of study. It also includes photos of the senior class officers, and Mr. Archibald, to whom the yearbook was dedicated. Many of the clubs dedicated their year to helping World War I home front efforts.
  • Yearbook

    Salem Normal School (Salem Normal School, 1915-01-01)
    Yearbook of the Class of 1915 at the Salem Normal School. Includes group photos of the graduating class, the Glee Club, and the football team. Also includes a photograph of Principal J. Asbury Pitman, to whom the yearbook was dedicated.
  • Normalites

    Salem Normal School (Salem Normal School, 1914-01-01)
    Yearbook of the Class of 1914 at the Salem Normal School. Includes group photos of the graduating class, the women's basketball team, and the men's basketball team. Also includes a photograph of Richard Williams Bray, a member of the class of 1914 who passed away.
  • Class Book

    Salem Normal School (Salem Normal School, 1911-01-01)
    Yearbook of the Class of 1911 at the Salem Normal School. Includes group photos of the graduating class, the women's basketball team, and the men's basketball team ("our first"). Also includes a photograph of Harriet Laura Martin, to whom the yearbook was dedicated.

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