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dc.contributor.authorWan-Lai Yue, Janis
dc.creatorWan-Lai Yue, Janis
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-07T15:59:37Z
dc.date.available2024-02-07T15:59:37Z
dc.date.issued2023-11-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13013/3163
dc.description.abstractThis essay traces my personal roots as an Asian-American woman with a father diagnosed with bipolar disorder and the impact of my lived experiences on my professional journey as a pediatric mental health occupational therapist. I highlight three exemplary client stories from my year as a doctoral resident at a community-based mental health agency that have furthered my critical analysis of our current child welfare system. Finally, I reflect upon the importance of collectively developing an abolitionist praxis as occupational therapists and health workers at large who are committed to building equitable systems of care that do not further harm structurally marginalized community members.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSchool of Social Worken_US
dc.subjectchild welfare system, abolition, transformative justice, BIPOC mental healthen_US
dc.titleMoving Towards an Abolitionist Praxis: Roots, Blossoms, and Seeds from an Occupational Therapy Doctoral Residenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleReflections: Narratives of Professional Helping
dc.source.volume29
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage11
dc.source.endpage22
dc.date.displayNovember 29, 2023en_US


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