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dc.contributor.authorAlvarez, Antonia R. G.
dc.creatorAlvarez, Antonia R. G.
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-07T15:28:15Z
dc.date.available2024-02-07T15:28:15Z
dc.date.issued2023-09-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13013/3152
dc.description.abstractThis is a poem that emerged in the wake of another incident of anti-Asian violence and my own rage and exhaustion as a queer, Filipina-American social work educator and scholar-mama, teaching throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and the endemic of anti-Blackness in the United States. I reflect on the experiences of feeling sadness and anger towards Asian community members who support white supremacy, feeling like the energy that goes into my teaching is built to be drained, and the loneliness of the work. The poem ends with a metaphorical monstrosity of the body of a woman of color in the academy that appears briefly and then slinks away seeking shelter and solace, buried in the sand.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSchool of Social Worken_US
dc.subjectpoetryen_US
dc.subjectanti-Asian hateen_US
dc.subjectsocial work educationen_US
dc.subjectresistanceen_US
dc.subjectliberatory pedagogyen_US
dc.titlethree nine twenty one (3/9/21)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleReflections: Narratives of Professional Helping
dc.source.volume29
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage49
dc.source.endpage51
dc.date.displaySeptember 29, 2023en_US


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