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dc.contributor.advisorSampiere, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorCaliskan, Stephen
dc.creatorCaliskan, Stephenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-27T18:26:47Z
dc.date.available2023-07-27T18:26:47Z
dc.date.issued2023-05-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13013/2964
dc.description.abstractWhen we think of theatrical plays, we tend to categorize them as either “comedy” or “drama”. Despite there being innumerable sub-genres, we usually recognize the core of the work as being either comedic or dramatic. Although there are obviously differences between these two overarching genres, there tends to be significant overlap between them. My thesis explores not only the fundamental differences between comedy and drama, but also this very overlap. To achieve this, I have written two plays, first workshopped in theater Professor Bill Cunningham's playwriting class last semester, using the playwrights’ primary tools–plot, characterization, dialogue, and theme–and although one is “comedic” at its core and the other “dramatic”, I have sought to examine the link between the two. The first play is a modern comedy that deals with the absurdity of our relationships, and the invariable humor that arises as a result. The second is a period piece set in the 1800’s, and its theme deals with what happens when our moral complacencies meet the sins of our past. Although the two plays are different in style, dialogue and even theme, I have sought to link comedy and drama in both works. In these plays, as in life, there is pain in humor and laughter through our tears. To prepare for this project, I have closely examined the plays written by my favorite playwrights, including Neil Simon, Arthur Miller, Woody Allen, and Sam Shepard. I have learned about the process of crafting a play both from these masters and in the playwriting class I had taken last semester, and have worked with the primary tools at the playwright's disposal to craft each piece. I found that workshopping my plays in that class to be a wonderful education in learning what works, what doesn’t, and whether or not I am communicating what I want to say with each piece to an audience. I have been able to workshop my plays even further in conjunction with my advisor, Professor Peter Sampieri, as we have worked with actors who have helped read each scene aloud. This has enabled me to tighten up each play considerably. On Thursday, May 11, I intend to put both my plays on their feet, in the form of a staged reading of each. I will judge this project to be successful if I have created a community of shared experience within the audience. If they are able to recognize some of themselves in either of these plays, and if they can identify with both the humor and the pathos, I will consider my work to have been worthwhile.en_US
dc.titleCrying Laughing: An Exploration of the Fundamental Differences and Overlap Between the Twoen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.departmentTheatre and Speech Communicationen_US
dc.date.displayMay 2023en_US
dc.type.degreeBachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)en_US
dc.subject.keywordcomedyen_US
dc.subject.keyworddramaen_US
dc.subject.keyworddramedyen_US
dc.subject.keywordaudience responseen_US
dc.subject.keywordvisceral reactionen_US


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