Now showing items 21-37 of 37

    • The Tactics Of Confrontation: Documentary Epistemology In The Fiction Of W.G. Sebald

      Mulman, Lisa; Pieroni, Adam (2017-12-01)
      Of the many enigmatic features of W.G. Sebald's fiction, perhaps the most perplexing is the author's uncanny ability to convey a topic while avoiding explicit reference to it. This is especially true in regard to the Holocaust, a topic Sebald rarely labels with terms traditionally associated with its history, but which arguably constitutes the ethical core of the works. Partially in response to historian Saul Frieländer's suggestion that literature may potentially offer cohesion to "the growing fragmentation of the history of the Nazi period" ("Trauma" 52), this thesis investigates the relationship between Sebald's unique stylistics and its representation of the Holocaust. Through close readings of Sebald's work, I demonstrate that Sebald's and Friendländer's texts are undergirded by similar ethical and epistemological positions, which in turn help explain their significant rhetorical differences. Indeed, the stark contrasts of those differences speaks to the continuing potency of the events to impose a disjunctive effect (despite ethical affinities of the authors) on Holocaust representation.
    • Borne: A Novel

      Carey, Kevin; Callan, Patricia (2018-04-01)
      A married mother of one young child finds herself hospitalized after a car accident. While recovering, it is gradually revealed that she had an abortion the day of the accident. Her family members react to the news of the abortion in varying ways, and her relationship with her mother is particularly complicated by the secret. Their discovery that she also had a brief affair continues to alter family dynamics.
    • Commander & Queen: Part I, Beiramar

      Carey, Kevin; Freeman, Ciara J. (2017-05-01)
      The first chapter of Commander & Queen.
    • Burden

      Scrimgeour, J.D.; Tower, Jessica (2017-01-01)
      A collection of poems.
    • Bones And Allegories

      Scrimgeour, J.D.; Peary, Alexandria; Valens, Keja; Carver, M. P. (2017-05-01)
      A collection of poems.
    • The Classes And The Masses: Exploring Britain’s Evolving Notion Of Class During The Great War

      Walker, Peter; Hersey, Seth (2017-05-01)
      The First World War—or, the Great War, as it is commonly referred to in Britain— was a turning point of the twentieth century. Those who lived through the war saw their world transformed. National borders were redrawn; political ideals were shaken; and future certainties became less certain. The horrors of the fighting left many traumatized, as antiquated battlefield tactics and modern warfare technology clashed with catastrophic results. Traditional notions of heroic, single combat were replaced with an impersonal, mechanized destruction, the result of which was the killing of approximately fifteen million people (Puchner 1682). To many, the changes heralded by the war were unbelievable: literary giant Henry James could not believe that the years of prosperity leading up to the war ended in such a disastrous climax (713). The war’s vastness, brutality, and mechanization also helped destroy many nineteenth century social ideals. Looking back at her war experience, Vera Brittain remarked that the war “will make a big division of ‘before’ and ‘after’ in the history of the world, almost if not quite as big as the ‘B.C.’ and ‘A.D.’ division made by the birth of Christ” (Brittain 317). Noted World War One historian Paul Fussell feels the war left “a deep diving line” across the twentieth century, with the post-war world appearing “recognizably ‘modern,’ its institutions precarious, its faith feeble, its choices risky, its very landscapes perverted into Waste Land” (Introduction vii). The literary world reflected many of these changes. In fact, a strong argument could be made that the war era fueled the modernist literary movement. Many works of modernism confront the war and its aftereffects: the horrors of war in Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms (1929), the hypocrisy of nationalism in Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front (1929), the social and moral complexities of wartime Britain in Ford’s Parade’s End tetralogy (1924-28), the plight of a shell-shocked veteran in Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway (1925), the alienation of modernity in Eliot’s poem “The Wasteland” (1922), and so on. Many more works draw inspiration from the war and its unsettling nature, and it is clear that the war roused the literary imagination. Study of this literary period underscores how the war helped create a modern and fragmented world. Even though there is much analysis of the modern period, and though much has been gleaned about how the works of modernism reflect a war-changed world, there is one area that merits further investigation: the evolving notion of class in wartime Britain.
    • A Silence Broken

      Peary, Alexandria; Bulger, Evalynn (2017-05-01)
      This is a collection of poems centered around the experiences of my family during the Khmer Rouge's control that last from 1975-1979. The Cambodian people were robbed of their voice and forced into silence. This collection serves as an attempt to restore their voices. And as with life, though there are heavy and chilling moments, there are still moments of beauty.
    • Facing Trauma Through Art: Arab Women's War Narratives

      Young, Stephenie; Hashem, Danah (2016-01-01)
      This thesis examines samples of fiction, visual art, and photography by Arab women as testimonies to wartime traumas suffered within their home nations. This thesis examines non-consensual photographic representations of sexual assault. Photographic representations of sexual assault impact how American culture not only sees but also treats survivors of sexual assault. These photographs, however, represent sexual assault, not assault survivors. Representations circulated by someone other than the survivor do not narrate her experience and may in fact risk silencing and suppressing her. Therefore, representations of sexual assault are most survivor-positive when they are created and distributed by the survivor herself Using the Steubenville rape case and Emma Sulkowicz's case, this thesis explores the risks that circulations of non-consensual representations can have on survivors.
    • Is Storytelling Dead?: Finding Walter Benjamin's "Story" in the Modern Fantasy Genre

      Nowka, Scott; Theis, Jeffrey; Young, Stephenie; Clifton, Jeanne (2014-05-01)
      Walter Benjamin in his 1936 essay "The Storyteller" identifies the quintessential elements of a style of writing he terms the story, found in folktales and epics, which he contrasts to the modern novel. While Benjamin believed that this form of narrative was dying out, by looking at the works of Robert Jordan and Patrick Rothfuss this paper will prove that this type of narrative is still in existence today and found frequently in the modern fantasy genre.
    • Auschwitz Has Formal Consequences: Imre Kertész and "The Rule of Metaphor"

      Mulman, Lisa; Sullivan, Jill (2016-01-01)
      This thesis undertakes a formal analysis of the work of Hungarian Holocaust survivor and Nobel Prize winner Imre Kertész. Looking at his four novels published in English, I argue that Kertész employs his experience in the concentration camps as a master metaphor for understanding contemporary society. Exploring the work of a variety of scholars, including linguist and philosopher Paul Ricoeur's treatise The Rule of Metaphor, I investigate how Kertész uses specific narrative strategies to create a new language commensurate with the ethical imperative to illuminate the meaning of existence in a post-Holocaust world.
    • Above Average in New York City

      Scrimgeour, J.D.; Anonymous (2016-01-01)
      A dance memoir featuring scenes of New York and reflections on the life of a young, female artist. The author has chosen to redact portions of the memoir
    • "A Creature for Whom Art Can Do Nothing": Femininity, Performance, and Gender Subversion in The Wild Irish Girl and Mansfield Park

      Valens, Keja; Jaros, Michael; Grandmont, Megan (2016-01-01)
      Both Owenson's The Wild Irish Girl and Austen's Mansfield Park feature female protagonists whose performances — musical, theatrical, and social — help construct their performances of a particular kind of gender identity, that of the natural woman. The natural woman is a gender ideal that is supposedly artless, truthful, and opposed to performance. However, in performing, often sincerely, the role of the natural woman, through explicit forms of performance like music and theatre and through gender performance, the women of these texts achieve the subversion of otherwise strictly mandated gender roles. By playing their sanctioned part to a hyperbolic extreme, The Wild Irish Girl's Glorvina and Mansfield Park's Fanny redirect the fundamental qualities of the character they play — truthfulness, purity, naturalness —in a way that allows them to gain the agency to make political and personal choices that would otherwise be disallowed.
    • On Time, History, And Metaphysics: The Thought of Cormac McCarthy and Walter Benjamin

      Mulman, Lisa; Jaros, Michael; Valens, Keja; Bishop, Jonathan (2015-01-01)
      Walter Benjamin and Cormac McCarthy — one a German philosopher and critic, the other an American novelist, playwright, and screenwriter — have much in common. Stylistically, both use a mixture of short and long but poetic phrases that seem to cut right through to the heart. There is also the matter of historical examination. Benjamin most famously said that "there is no document of civilization which is not at the same time a document of barbarism." McCarthy would likely agree: consider his Blood Meridian, which pits the monstrous Judge Holden against everyone else, and Captain White's crew, to which the Judge belongs, against Native Americans, who are also quite violent. McCarthy, like Benjamin, explores the meaning of storytelling. For instance, the father, in The Road, informs his son of the world that has now crumbled into dust; both of them inhabit a post-apocalyptic landscape. Finally, both writers alternate between a materialism and an understanding of the mystical, the metaphysical, the transcendent side of existence, occupying a sort of liminal space. This paper will explore these connections. It will focus on the following McCarthy novels: The Road, No Country for Old Men, and Blood Meridian. And, for Benjamin: Illuminations, Selected Writings, paying particular attention to "Theses on the Philosophy of History" and "The Storyteller."
    • "Object of Vision": Non-Consensual Photographic Representations of Sexual Assault

      Risam, Roopika; Rodrigue, Tanya; Valens, Keja; Mooney, Anne (2016-01-01)
      This thesis examines non-consensual photographic representations of sexual assault. Photographic representations of sexual assault impact how American culture not only sees but also treats survivors of sexual assault. These photographs, however, represent sexual assault, not assault survivors. Representations circulated by someone other than the survivor do not narrate her experience and may in fact risk silencing and suppressing her. Therefore, representations of sexual assault are most survivor-positive when they are created and distributed by the survivor herself. Using the Steubenville rape case and Emma Sulkowicz's case, this thesis explores the risks that circulations of non-consensual representations can have on survivors.
    • Types of Photographic Inquiry and Their Effects on the Collective Memory of Genocide

      Samantha, Aiello (2015-08-01)
      Beginning in the 20th century the progression of photography and the reoccurrence of genocide collided and perpetuated a new kind of widespread collective memory. While the idea that groups of people shared a collective memory was theorized prior to the dissemination of photography, photographic inquiry into genocide initiated a global collective memory. As photography expanded with new technology and creativity the ways in which genocide was photographed changed as well and images started to play an even larger roll in these historical atrocities. Now, diverse types of photographs have the power to impact the collective memory in various ways. Images of mass graves, landscapes, street photography, family photographs and portraits hold different influence over collective memory and force it to be accessed, used, and remembered in specific ways.
    • Traumatic Dualities: Religion and Recovery in African-American Women's Writing

      Risam, Roopika; Althea, Terenzi (2015-08-01)
      The thesis explores the sacred in three modern African American novels: Beloved by Toni Morrison (1987), Praisesong for the Widow by Paule Marshall (1983), and The Color Purple by Alice Walker (1970). These novels include female protagonists who have undergone various traumas, though all of their traumas extend from their positions as black women in white male dominated America. The inclusion of both Western and African religious elements relates to their individual and cultural traumas, and patterns in sacred motifs in each novel are read as paths to reconciliation.
    • Whales, Legs, Harpoons, and Other Things: Methodological Fetishism and the Human-Object Relationship in Moby-Dick

      Nowka, Scott; DeFrancis, Theresa; Button, Catherine (2014-05-01)
      This work means to examine Moby-Dick through Bill Brown's use of methodological fetishism and to build upon his argument. The human-object dialectic is explored and flipped, providing a view of the novel in which the objects take precedent and create a collection of quasi-objects that distorts the typical approach of analysis through human action and thought. The objects in the novel act upon the humans in ways of their own - telling stories, taking on different roles, commanding the crew, and creating and destroying their quasi-object human counterparts.