Recent Submissions

  • Streaming Consciousness: Treading the Conceptual Rapids of Psychological Theory

    Noonan, Anne; Hayden, Felicia Marie (2016-05-01)
    This thesis is the first section in a book length project. The aim of this thesis is to explore the relationship between the academic field of psychology and the creative nature of the field. Through use of memoir, detail, and conscious experience, this thesis is a contemporary interpretation of the theories of Sigmund Freud.
  • Pleasure and Pain in Charlotte Bronte's Villette and Jane Eyre

    Mulman, Lisa; Frank, Tirzah (2016-05-01)
    Like every character, Lucy Snowe and Jane Eyre, respective protagonists of Charlotte Brontë's Villette and Jane Eyre, grapple with pursuing pleasure and avoiding pain. Pleasure and pain are unavoidable universals, of course, but everyone treats their own pleasure and pain differently. Furthermore, pleasure and pain do not exist in a vacuum; there are other considerations—such as morality, self-respect, and lack of absolute control—that affect how each person treats and prioritizes them. Lucy and Jane, in particular, are not hedonists, so when looking at how they pursue pleasure and avoid pain, it is also important to account for the things that they care about more than either. Examining how Brontë's heroines approach pleasure and pain in relation to other facets of their lives reveals their priorities, an understanding of which is essential to understanding their choices and burgeoning selfhood.
  • Navigating My Life: Memoirs of a College Student

    Flynn, Regina; Danca, Lisa Ashley (2016-05-01)
    For many students, college is one of the most defining times in a person's life. With the overarching theme of coming-of-age, this collection of creative nonfiction essays details the author's personal development during her college years. The pieces are centered on experiences, including her time spent as an orientation leader, her travels to Europe and the Northeastern United States, and her coverage of a political rally.
  • The Whale as an Object: Examining the Subject/Object Relationship in Herman Melville's Moby Dick

    Riss, Arthur; Bennett, Julia (2016-05-01)
    Hieroglyphic images appear recurrently throughout the text of Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. Whether the marks in question are ancient Egyptian ciphers, Queequeg’s cryptic tattoos, or scars on the backs of whales, Melville claims all are hieroglyphical. This project will examine Melville’s use of hieroglyphics in Moby Dick to broach debates about what language is and how it gets its meaning. Do words have intrinsic significance, or is their significance supplied by the reader alone? Are all—or any—hieroglyphics decipherable? What could ancient Egyptian figures have in common with the “hieroglyphic” scratches on whales? This project will engage with John T. Irwin’s American Hieroglyphics, perhaps the most notable work to use the hieroglyphic in raising questions of meaning and interpretation. Additionally, the project will incorporate works by John Searle and Walter Benn Michaels to explore different accounts of what language is, what texts count as language, and how language becomes meaningful.
  • The Rebirth of Chile in Relation to Childbirth and Female Pain

    Valens, Keja; Carella, Melissa (2013-01-01)
    Chilean novelists Isabel Allende and Diamela Eltit wrote during a time in which Augusto Pinochet’s reign created chaos within the government and suffering for its citizens. In the works The House of the Spirits by Allende and The Fourth World by Eltit, emphasis is placed on the female characters’ inability to have full freedom of speech, and also how the burdens of conceiving a child and giving birth became not just an infliction upon their bodies but upon their existence as women in a disadvantaged society. By analyzing the conceptions, pregnancies, and births of various characters in the novels while referencing how society treated women during Pinochet’s dictatorship, this paper will reveal that childbirth is used as a metaphor for the birth of a new Chile.
  • One- A Collection of Poetry

    Peary, Alexandria; Huang, Chengyu (2015-05-01)
    This poetry collection - One - records touching moments in my life, the sparkles of my thoughts. This project consists of twenty-one poems along with a table of contents, foreword, introduction, acknowledgements and notes. It is broken down into four different sections titled Hazy/Mist, Things Remembered, Hallucinating and Trigger. The title of the poetry collection was chosen as "one" because I wanted to convey that everyone's life is unique. Like the gambling game with fate, you'll never know what will happen in the next second. With specific rules of the usage of imagery, metaphors, and similes, and musical rhythms, my poetry style contains not only Chinese styles but also other Western free art forms.
  • Unreal Magazine: A Feminist Magazine Dedicated to Women in Music

    Glasser, Perry; Vinciguerra, Lauren (2015-05-01)
    The basis of this project was to create an online magazine geared towards the subject of women in music. In today's society, women are still seen and treated as second-class citizens. In particular, women are considered to be less talented and are typically taken less-seriously than their male counterparts. Because of this, it is important to showcase female musicians in a strong, empowering light in order to show and fix the sexism and misconstrued ideals in today's society. For this project, I read both music and feminist publications in order to better understand the subject matters and industries. I had to continually stay up-to-date with music blogs and websites in order to discover new music and artists that would complement my magazine. The end result was an e-zine that showcased female musicians in a positive light. I made sure to write each article so females were portrayed as accomplished, hard-working, and unique members of the music industry and society as a whole. Seeing all these articles together in a cohesive manner made it clear that misogyny is apparent and impossible to ignore in today's society. Creating a visual representation of influential women will encourage both women and men to pursue their passions despite obstacles and challenges. The e-zine can be found at: http://unrealzine.wix.com/unreal
  • William Butler Yeats: Nationalism, Mythology, and the New Irish Tradition

    Elia, Richard; Welch, Samuel N. (2015-05-01)
    William Butler Yeats has been regarded as one of the most important poets of the modern era. His poetry is known throughout the world for its attention to form, masterful imagery, and its distinctly Irish nature. Always a patriot, much of Yeats’ life was devoted to the resurrection of Irish culture in what he hoped would be a Celtic Renaissance free from the heavily political implications of the Irish nationalist movement of his time. This essay seeks to discuss and understand Yeats’ methods and inspirations behind conveying his nationalism and love of Irish lore through his poetry, especially in his earlier years of publication. He was concerned not just with people’s knowledge of Ireland and her storied past, but also with the cultural wellbeing of Ireland’s future, especially when it came to fostering future Irish artists and creative types. This essay examines seven works by Yeats organized into three sections, each individual section representing a different point in his creative journey towards finding his voice for Ireland’s future writers and artists. His hope was to foster the creation of a literary tradition that was Irish in its roots for the entertainment, advancement, and representation of a thoroughly Irish people. This paper seeks to discover how exactly he went about attempting to create such a tradition.
  • Disordered: A Collection of Poetry

    Peary, Alexandria; Tower, Jessica (2015-05-01)
    The basis for this chapbook of poetry (titled Disordered) was my experience with mental illnesses. There is a problem with lack of awareness of mental illness in writing communities and in other communities, as well as stigma surrounding these diseases. The title was chosen because I wanted to convey the idea that mental illness is something that is very difficult to deal with; however, it does not necessarily mean that you are disabled, a word that comes with a negative connotation. The projects consists of fifteen poems along with a table of contents, artist’s note, introduction, acknowledgements, notes, and reflection. It is broken down into three sections titled Collapse/Relapse, Me/You, and Potential. In my project, I wanted to portray people with mental illnesses as people similar to everyone else. However, I also wanted to show the unique problems that people with mental illnesses face. I feel that it is important to show both of these sides of people with mental illness, in order to get a full picture of what it is really like to have a mental illness. Writing in general helps me heal from my mental illnesses, and writing specifically about mental illness has helped me learn how to heal more effectively. My hope is that others will be able to relate to my writing and that it will bring about less stigma surrounding mental illness.
  • Adolescent Attitudes Towards Social Media in the Classroom

    Risam, Roopika; Favor, Bryanna (2015-05-01)
    As a future educator, I am concerned with the growing influence of social media in the lives of adolescents. With technology constantly changing, educators must reevaluate their techniques in order to teach effectively. For example, teachers might consider the relationship between students’ attention spans and their social media use. Teachers might also consider the effects of the different styles of writing students read online. This project examines the correlation between high school students' writing habits and their social media usage. Data has been gathered from 19 high school juniors in an AP Language and Composition class. The methodology for this project uses grounded theory research and includes surveys and writing samples. Students completed a survey about their social media usage that asked what websites they use, how often they use these websites, and whether or not they try to use proper spelling and grammar when posting online. In addition to the survey, students also provided an "on demand" writing sample of approximately 180 words. In order to discern any correlation between social media usage and writing habits, data was coded to identify differences in sentence length, spelling/grammar issues, incorrect punctuation usage, usage of transitions, awkward phrasing, and usage of the first person. This study found that there was no correlation between students’ social media habits and their writing styles. However, the data revealed students’ attitudes towards using social media in the classroom, information that is essential for teachers to understand in order to utilize technology effectively.
  • Nature's Presents

    O'Neil, January; Bator, Samantha (2015-05-01)
    When many people are outside in nature, they don’t notice many little events taking place. For example, a person might not notice a field mouse darting under a staircase or a frog that is severely injured. This collection of poems documents my experiences in nature, including many happenings that usually go unnoticed. During the writing process, I went through many steps, probably the most important of which was the writing period. First, I had to find inspiration. Most of my poems were written at Audubon Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary in Topsfield, MA. I found, as I walked around the sanctuary, that many incidents were happening around me all the time, many which I might not have noticed if I was not so aware of my surroundings. I often took pictures to document these experiences, which I have included in the first section of this collection, titled “Nature’s Presence.” All of my poems were about real events that happened or based of off real events that happened to me, truly documenting my experiences in the natural world.
  • Milan Kundera and the Narrative Self

    Deere, Michael; Sagendorph, Melissa (2013-12-01)
    In my thesis, I looked at several of Milan Kundera's novels to explore the relationship between the self and narratives. Specifically, I was interested in how narrative shapes the perception of our selves, both from internal and external perspectives. Using particular characters and historical contexts from Kundera's novels, I also argue from a non-traditional notion of truth that neither an inner or inhabited self nor a perceived external self can authoritatively claim to be more real or fundamental than the other. I argue that because the two are so intimately connected, even self-perception is impossible independent of a narrative.
  • Finding The Extraordinary In The Ordinary: Susan Orlean's Impact On Creative Nonfiction

    Peary, Alexandria; Perez, Sofia (2021-05-01)
    Susan Orlean is one of the most innovative creative nonfiction writers of our time. Her interest in people and the ability to connect with them greatly inspires her work. She has worked for the New Yorker since 1992 and has published multiple collections of literary journalism pieces and book-length works such as The Orchid Thief, Library Book, and Saturday Night. Orlean is known for her ability to draw inspiration from the ordinary things in life. She takes on the role of a researcher, spending time with people all over the country (and sometimes the world), exploring normal aspects in their lives that seem outlandish to others. Writing about the eccentric, abnormal, and mundane is not a challenge for her, as some subjects she has written about are orchid collecting, taxidermy, library fires, and female bullfighters. As we dive into the world of creative nonfiction, I will ask, what makes us so interested to hear about the truth within everyday life that she writes about? How does she catch our attention and keep it? Orlean writes nonfiction, yet as readers, we feel as if we are reading a story that we cannot put down. She utilizes techniques such as; dialogue, word choice, and scene-setting to establish a strong narrative voice that compels you to keep reading. This presentation explores the creative nonfiction works of Orlean and analyzes her writing strategies and tactics she uses to both inform and interest her audience.
  • Pisces

    Scrimgeour, J.D.; Munsell, Kaitlyn (2021-05-01)
    Pisces is a collection of poems that give glimpses into my childhood, adolescent, and adulthood. They are also about learning how to heal, places that gave me serenity, and people that have inspired and molded me into who I am today. The title Pisces is a term that comes from astrology, and what happens to be my astrology sign. There are no poems that include or discuss my astrological sign. However, all my poems represent who I am, where I’ve come from, what inspires me, and events in my life that resonated with me the most. This collection is heavily influenced by some modern poets and their works, making use of some of their techniques to tell personal stories. Wallace Stevens and his selected poems in Sleeping on A Wing made me think about where writers get their inspiration from, and how we can see the world in a different way. In Stevens’s poem "Thirteen Ways of Looking at A Blackbird," he takes an object and looks at it from a variety perspective, exploring how one might encounter or see blackbirds. This collection uses this technique to write about objects that have sentimental value to me, such as my father’s military dog tags. These inspirations and themes represented within my collection not only represent my growth overtime, but my love for dance, my friends, and my family. I hope that my poems can shed light onto topics that are not talked about, and to send a message that you are never alone.
  • Implications Of Inaccurate Representation In Crime And Prison Television Dramas

    Risam, Roopika; Patel, Shivani (2021-05-01)
    The criminal justice system in the United States is extremely discriminatory against Black and Latinx people in particular and has many issues with racial disparities. Mass incarceration, legal discrimination, and unsafe prison conditions are only some of the problems that the system is facing. Black people have been disproportionately targeted by this system, as they have always been subject to over-policing and racism in the law, though Latinx people are also overrepresented in the system in comparison to the general population. The establishment of the War on Drugs in the 1980s only expanded these practices, and now the criminal justice system is at its breaking point. Media culture plays a role in shaping public sentiment about the criminal justice system. Television dramas about crime and prison sensationalize the system by encoding harmful narratives about crime and prison, which leads to audiences to decoding stereotypical and sensational messages. Using Stuart Hall’s encoding/decoding model of media communication, this project investigates the impact of television dramas on viewers’ perceptions of crime, prison, and the criminal justice system. I analyze two popular television dramas, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit and Oz, in relation to research on the realities of the criminal justice system and the impact of television on viewers. My analysis demonstrates that there are many ways in which these programs perpetuate harmful and inaccurate messages and stereotypes to viewers about crime, prison, criminals, and the criminal justice system due to inadequate representation, lack of productive discourse about crime and prison, and racist imagery encoding.
  • Ebony Eyes

    Risam, Roopika; Gelin, Christina (2021-05-01)
    The poetry collection Ebony Eyes expresses the perspective of Black students attending predominantly white institutions and the multitude of emotions and experiences that accompany that. The purpose of this poetry collection is to both provide a black voice, which is often low in representation at PWIs, and creatively discuss how the experience of Black students differ from their peers. Throughout eighteen poems, the collection highlights the racial stressors that Black students oftentimes face in their college experience: microaggressions, triggered trauma, racial profiling, white washing of history, and more. Ebony Eyes sheds light on the role systematic racism can play at predominantly white institutions and through this lens, with the goal of prompting healthy dialogue about how predominantly white institutions can be inclusive—not just diverse.
  • Comparing Generational Portrayal in the Holocaust Graphic Novel Memoir

    Young, Stephenie; Bowden, Jillian (2021-05-01)
    As we study the descendants of Holocaust survivors and the testimonies they give, we see how the effects of the event are not stagnant but move from the witnesses to their offspring. To better understand these narratives when they are told through different mediums, they have been divided into "generations": the first, 1.5, second, third, and so on and so forth. Susan Suleiman describes the 1.5 generation as the child survivors who suffered through trauma, and later, as adults, reflect on their childhood experiences (277; Felman and Laub 1992; Langer 1991, as cited in Suleiman 291). The second-generation of survivors are the children of those who survived the Holocaust (Suleiman 277). Marianne Hirsch uses the term 'postmemory' to refer to the memory that the second-generation has of their parents' traumatic events, something that they did not experience, yet suffer the effects from (4). Since the generations have different ways of processing and remembering the event, the memory of the Holocaust is represented differently by each. In this thesis, I analyze how generational memory of the Holocaust is shown through the artistic mediums of three graphic novel memoirs: We Are on Our Own (2006) by Miriam Katin, and Maus I: A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds History (1986) and Maus II: A Survivor's Tale: And Here My Troubles Began (1991) by Art Spiegelman. Katin's novel represents the 1.5 generation and both of Spiegelman's represent the second-generation. Through this analysis I have found that although there are differences in how the generations tell their stories, they also share important similarities.
  • Tiny Victories

    Carey, Kevin; Snook, Kayma (2020-12-01)
    Tiny Victories is a poetry collection that was experiential as much as it was research based. In preparing for this creative project, I read many collections, and spoke to poets to discuss their process. Preparation for this collection included writing free-hand in my journal for months, and reaching back into old journals I’ve kept since middle school and then transferring and editing these words to craft poems. This required reflection, revisiting old pain and past loves and ultimately a reworking of my world. In this collection I explored themes of mental health, memory, nostalgia, trauma, time and healing. The title Tiny Victories was meant to capture a duality with tiny obviously meaning small and victory invoking a large feeling of conquest. I used this to define a concept of “baselines” without actually ever using the term. This concept was introduced to me by an old therapist and has changed my perspective and provides comfort. It basically means we all have different capacities on different days. Getting out of bed or taking a shower on some days is a real win for me, which is not to say I am not also capable of accomplishing astronomical feats. I wanted to make this focus and idea clear to validate my experience as well as potentially those of my readers. This collection features an applied study of a variety of classic forms as well as free-verse. The collection is divided into two sections titled Unlearning and Relearning, which is meant to repeat the duality within the cycle of human development, involving both regression and rebuilding. This theme is repeated throughout the collection to tell a story of revisiting and reframing trauma and experience for therapeutic purposes.
  • Starry-Eyed, Grounded-Feet: A Sci-Fi Collection

    Scrimgeour, J.D.; Pennington, Bailey (2020-05-01)
    Starry-Eyed Grounded-Feet: A Sci-Fi Collection, consists of two stories. In the first story “The Window between Me and the Night Sky,” Anna Marie’s routine is disrupted by genius rebel, Margot. Margot’s unfiltered views on life draw out Anna Marie from her self-imposed placid way of life. This story shows how on-campus college culture acts as little more then a boarding school and in sheltering students does little to prepare them for the vastness of the life post school. The second story, “The Book of Cathleen Rose,” follows Cathleen ‘Cathy’ Rose. Cathy’s life is thrown off-kilter after people from another planet appear. From PTSD as a result for the alarm and shifting reality their presence brought to the realization that there is a Cathleen Rose on their world – a long dead author who lived a miserable life. Cathy then makes drastic decisions to get out of a life path she had fallen into passively. “The Book of Cathleen Rose,” reflects on the rigidness of college and career paths that don’t reflect the many different ways life can branch off.
  • Mild Inconveniences: A Collection Of Essays

    Peary, Alexandria; Walton, Casey (2020-05-01)
    Life is good at being inconvenient. It’s these inconveniences that make us who we are. In this thesis, I explore embarrassment, annoyances and memories. These things all made me the person that I am. Though they seem to be the worst thing possible at the time, they end up becoming positive memories that I can laugh about. When you learn to laugh at yourself, life becomes more fun.

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