• Todos Estamos Satisfechos? Are We All Satisfied? A Review of the Literature

      Fraley, Hannah; Crampton, Taylor (2015-05-01)
      United States healthcare is experiencing a growing need for medical interpretation among diverse populations. Of note, the Hispanic population is steadily growing reaching upwards of 17% of the US population. The Hispanic patient experience and perception of care is poorly understood in the context of patient to provider communication in the US, despite 62% of Hispanics primarily speaking Spanish and limited English. A review of the literature was conducted, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) database was exhaustively searched for English language research published between 2000 and October 2014 that identified disparities between Spanish-speakers and English-speakers regarding their healthcare experiences. Keyword searches included the following: Spanish speaking patients, patient satisfaction, and health disparity. Of twenty-five articles initially yielded by the search strategy, seventeen articles were selected that met inclusion criteria for further analysis and review. Within these articles, it appeared that patients generally did experience a lower rate of satisfaction as compared to English-speaking patients regarding their healthcare providers and the language utilized. Contrastingly, an article described a population of Spanish-speaking patients whose language barrier was not reported as an issue when being assessed for domestic violence. Limited research exists which targets the Hispanic patient population and language barriers faced when communicating with their health care providers. This presents an important gap in the literature to consider for this patient population specifically their experiences and perceptions of how care is delivered in the US. Culturally relevant research is needed in order to appropriately change the way in which health care is delivered to this population, which will ultimately improve patient to provider communication and health literacy.
    • Treating Patients With Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP): The Challenges Of Implementing Nursing Bundles Of Care

      Ebersole, Nancy; Guzman, Emilee (2022-05-01)
      A ventilator is any device used to support, assist, or control respiration. Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) can result from long term mechanical ventilation and causes a major life-threatening infection that has a high prevalence in patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) within our hospitals today. Despite having life-saving benefits, mechanical ventilation puts patients at a high risk of developing VAP; this increases the length of hospital stay, increases the cost of treatment, and decreases patient quality of life. Therefore, hospitals have implemented standardized preventative care interventions or “bundles” for mechanically ventilated patients in attempts to reduce the overall VAP prevalence, and infection rate. A systemic literature review was performed using the CINAHL Plus database to investigate the challenges posed to nurses when implementing VAP care bundle interventions in ICU patients. Major themes are (a) VAP bundles significantly reduce days on a ventilator and days in the ICU, (b) What is in the care bundle matters, (c) Nursing compliance is related to education and years of experience, (d) Barriers to nursing adherence is related to the use of bundles, (e) Institutional barriers that affect nursing adherence to the use of bundles. The registered nurse is in a key position to mitigate the risk of VAP. Hospitals must provide standardized nursing policies that emerge from interpersonal communication with bedside nurses to enforce Evidence Based Practices. In the future, to provide optimal care for mechanically ventilated patients, hospitals must take action to create changes to overcome institutional barriers which impact patient care.
    • Undergraduate Nursing Students Attitudes Toward Physician Assisted Suicide

      Delis, Pamela; Lundblad, Kendyl (2018-01-01)
      Physician assisted suicide consists of a doctor providing a patient with the lethal means of a medication (usually the barbituate secobarbital) to administer themselves at their own will. Euthanasia is a slightly different form of physician assisted suicide, where the doctor takes an active role and administers the lethal dose of a medication (usually secobarbital) to the patient. As expected, this practice abounds with controversy. This research seeks to study baccalaureate student nurses’ opinions on physician assisted suicide. This research sought to understand if nursing students feel physician assisted suicide is ethical amongst certain situations, and whether or not they believe if it should be legalized in the United States. Using student nurses as the participants in this study seemed best because they most likely have, or will have, treated a critically or terminally ill patient. Nurses work the closest with these specific patients, and therefore their opinions on whether or not physician assisted suicide should be an option is extremely valuable. Survey methodology was used to conduct this research. The survey contained a few demographic questions and two scenarios for the students to state whether they agreed or not, and a space for their thoughts on the matter. Mostly all of the students, by the end of the survey, made it clear that they believe physician assisted suicide can and should be used within certain ethical situations.
    • Using the Ketogenic Diet to Reduce the Incidence of Pediatric Seizures: Helping Children and Families to Find a Better Quality of Life

      Ebersole, Nancy; Nowka, Scott; Gonsalves, Joanna; Wohler, Alison (2021-05-01)
      Seizure disorders have both medical as well as quality of life implications for anyone experiencing them. The use of medications to control and manage this disorder is not always effective and may cause side effects that discourage compliance with the prescribed drugs. All of these concerns are especially problematic for children with seizures and their families. The use of diet modifications to control seizures is showing promise as an alternative to medications. The high fat, ketogenic diet as well as the low glycemic index diet are being investigated to control seizures in children. A systematic review of the literature was done in the CINAHL Plus database. The themes identified across the studies are (a) the ketogenic diet was effective in reducing seizures whereas the low glycemic index diet was not; (b) compliance with diet changes is a significant concern in this patient population; (c) parents view quality of life differently than the children with seizure disorders and this can impact diet adherence; and (d) how this diet interacts with medications and alters other body functions must be considered when using the ketogenic diet for seizure management. These results indicate an opportunity for nurses to work with families and the health care team to reduce the incidence of seizures, improve treatment compliance, and enhance the quality of life. A treatment option which provides for the needs and desires of both the individual and the parents can strengthen the family unit and promote healthy outcomes for all.
    • Vaccines And The Evolution Of Society's Attitudes Toward Them: Implications For Future Nursing Practice

      Campbell, Charlene; Nowka, Scott; Shutt, Briana (2017-04-01)
      The various controversies surrounding vaccines are a pertinent topic in our society today and have increased fear related to immunization. Despite advances in medicine and the development of life-saving vaccines, diseases that were thought to be long gone have crept back into our society and become a public health concern once again. As the anti-vaccination movement gains momentum and parents choose not to vaccinate their children, there are increasing numbers of reported cases of once-eradicated diseases like Pertussis and Measles. A systematic literature review was done to explore immunizations and the evolution of their impact on society as well as to identify vaccine-related fears and their validity. Using Nola Pender’s Health Promotion Model as a theoretical framework, the goal of this review was to discuss implications for future nursing practice and to identify possible interventions for decreasing immunization fears.
    • Young Women With A Diagnosis Of Sarcoma: Decisions Related To Disease Treatment And Infertility Options

      Campbell, Charlene; Murungi, Sheilla (2019-05-01)
      Women suffering from sarcoma are often presented with the devastating news that they may experience infertility during or after chemotherapy and radiation treatment for the disease. Because of this, they must make the difficult decision to either go through with the treatments or explore options to preserve their fertility. Many of these women may be planning to have a family with biological children but undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatment might make those plans impossible. This study examined therapeutic advances for preserving fertility in women while maintaining a therapeutic regimen for treatment of the disease. This research also examined the extent to which these patients have a full understanding of these treatments and if they are adequately informed of all of the available options from which to choose. This comprehensive review of the literature examined the psychological effects of potential infertility resulting from sarcoma treatment on women (18-44 years old) and their families. This study also explored the resources available to patients suffering from psychological effects of sarcoma treatment and infertility and the efficacy of these resources. The overall purpose of this study was to further examine the possible treatment options for these patients with an emphasis on the methods and resources to help them navigate this devastating diagnosis.