• Parents' Perception of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) and Hope for Their Child Living with Plagiocephaly: A Case Series

      Leger, Robin; Durgin, Gabrielle (2014-05-17)
      Purpose: To examine Positional Plagiocephaly and its relationship to the parents’ perception of the quality of life (QOL) and hope for the future of their child. Study Design and Methods: For the purpose of this honors thesis, a descriptive case series with parent interviews of their experience with infants and toddlers with Positional Plagiocephaly was conducted. In addition, themes from parental postings from a web-based social network for parents of children treated for Positional Plagiocephaly were constructed. Results: A convenience sample of three cases with six parents and themes from the social network were obtained. Two of the case studies were family members and the third case study was a friend of a colleague. Posts made by parents from three pages on a social network were obtained. Consent was obtained prior to the start of the interviews. This project was accepted by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at Salem State University. The student researcher also completed the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (human subject training). This research demonstrated that larger case series are needed to look at the long term effects of this diagnosis. Both qualitative and quantitative studies on the nurse’s role, health- related quality of life (HRQOL), and hope measures need to be conducted. This research may also help nurses and other medical personnel address issues that parents who have a child with Positional Plagiocephaly are concerned about.
    • Patients, Providers, And Perceptions: Achieving Quality Of Care When Goals Are Not Aligned

      Ebersole, Nancy; Smith, Catherine (2022-05-01)
      Despite asthma remaining one of the most common chronic pediatric conditions, patients are still constantly hospitalized due to poor adherence to the treatment plan. Patient-centered care requires professionals to understand what barriers affect controlled asthma during healthy childhood/adolescent development. This literature review consists of seven key articles from the CINAHL and PubMed databases with common themes identified (a) providers and patients have different goals of effective care; (b) nurses can help identify family roles to manage asthma care while building patient resilience and (c) identifying factors that decrease treatment compliance. These themes highlight the need for nurses to expand their role as medical caregivers and educators into a mediator between pediatric patients, their family members, and their providers. At the same time, natural family roles need to be respected and patients can care for themselves with little distractions from having a healthy childhood. This helps to improve the quality of self-care and decrease hospital readmissions in pediatric patients with asthma.
    • Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injuries: Challenges in Providing Effective Patient Care and Importance of Proper Family Support

      Ebersole, Nancy; Conners, Kaitlyn (2021-05-01)
      The human brain is one of the most important, yet least understood, organs in the human body. This functional unit innervates every aspect of human life and is ever changing from conception until full maturity around age 25. Considering this, it makes sense that pediatric traumatic brain injuries are so misunderstood. Attempting to diagnose and monitor a traumatic injury to a complex organ that is still growing and developing is challenging for clinicians. Proper interaction with these children and their families is vital to physical health and psychosocial development. Identifying current knowledge and disseminating it is crucial for planning interventions and promoting healthy outcomes. A review of the literature was done using the CINAHL database, and articles collected identify themes that are important and unique to caring for these patients. The themes are (a) impact of age at time of injury on post injury behavior; (b) importance of proper identification of TBI related behaviors and appropriate interventions; (c) relationship between severity of injury and post injury behaviors; (d) patient challenges with internalizing and externalizing problems; and (e) role of home environment on post injury behaviors and recovery process. When caring for this patient population, it is important for health care providers to not use a "one size fits all" approach, as each patient will have a different presentation and different needs based on the factors listed above. The themes identified here provide a point of reference for clinicians when planning care for children who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.
    • Perceptions Of Senior Nursing Students Towards Interprofessional Collaboration Targeting Patient Care

      Moske-Weber, Charlene; Tsang, Joanna (2018-01-01)
      Interprofessional collaboration plays a significant role in the education of nursing students. In nursing school, students participate in a variety of clinical experiences that coincide with their theory classes. Clinical experiences also serve as a place for students to build their foundation on skills needed in the clinical field. Purpose: To investigate the means of interprofessional collaboration and the experiences of senior nursing students at Salem State University with interprofessional collaboration in the clinical setting. Methods: The study was conducted as a qualitative study amongst 178 senior nursing students in the Salem State Nursing Program. The ten-question survey is a modified version of the SPICE-R instrument, also known as the Students Perception of Physician-Pharmacist Interprofessional Clinical Education. In addition, an optional text box was added at the end of the survey for students to provide further comments about their clinical experiences. Results: Collected data was analyzed using SPSS. Of the possible 178 senior nursing students, 44 (25%) completed the survey. Seventy-five percent reported understanding what interprofessional collaboration. Of the 44 students, 52.3% strongly agree that working with another healthcare profession enhanced their education and 34.1% strongly agree they felt nursing students needed to more of a direct participant in interprofessional collaboration while learning to care for patients in clinical rotations. Of the 44 students, 40.9% agree clinical rotations were the ideal place within their respective curricula for health professional students to interact. Conclusion: Based on the feedback of the qualitative study, students also reported feeling satisfied with their clinical experiences in the past, in regards to their instructors and gaining clinical experience, especially an interest in preceptorship opportunities. With entry into professional nursing practice within the next year, senior nursing students also reported those with previous healthcare experience felt more involved with the interprofessional team than in clinical experiences. The results provided implications for nursing educators on understanding nursing students perceptions on interprofessional collaboration based on clinical experiences.
    • Period Poverty: How Access To Feminine Hygiene Products Affects The Psychosocial Development Of Young Women?

      Ebersole, Nancy; Duvivier, Cephora (2022-05-01)
      The purpose of this study was to assess the menstrual hygiene needs of adolescent girls and explore factors influencing poor access to products and related school absences amongst adolescent girls. Many young women cannot afford menstrual health products to meet their monthly needs, and this may impact their well-being and school performance. Period poverty is a subset of the broader issue of hygiene insecurity. As a result of hygiene insecurity, women often lack health, self-esteem, and dignity due to limited access to hygiene products such as sanitary towels or pads, tampons, soap, and clean underwear. A systematic review of the literature was done in the CINAHL Plus database, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases. The themes identified across the studies are (a) poor access to menstrual products, (b) school environment does not provide for the needs of young women and (c) inadequate education on menstrual health in schools. The results indicate there is an unmet need for affordable products and teaching that targets both the knowledge and management of menstruation. Inadequate menstruation hygiene has been shown to be linked to school absenteeism. In schools, there is a significant need for menstrual hygiene products, as well as regular use of school resources to get them. With additional research to help inform how period poverty impacts adolescent girls and young women, there is tremendous opportunity to help address this critical, yet under-addressed issue. Menstruation is an ongoing biological process that affects women and adolescent girls. Menstruating women, on average, use over 9,000 sanitary items throughout their lifetime, which adds up rapidly. Adolescent girls face struggles to manage their menstrual cycles and those in lower socioeconomic classes often lack access to the products they need. Despite how essential menstrual products are, there are vast number of adolescent girls who are unable to afford or acquire these necessities. This lack of access to period products is often referred to as, ‘period poverty’. This can result in delayed challenges in achieving psychosocial growth in adolescent girls, as evidenced by not attending school Lack of access to products amongst adolescent girls causes inhibitions in psychosocial settings and causes girls to not interact with others freely. Ultimately this can limit a girl’s potential and opportunities later in life. 1 in 5 girls in the United States reported having missed school because they did not have access to menstrual products. Without proper menstrual hygiene management (MHM), a girl’s attendance at school is reported to decline or cease altogether. Providing adequate resources to meet women's and girls' menstrual hygiene needs may have an impact on female school attendance rates and expanding women's education is critical in achieving one’s life goals.
    • Prenatal Counseling and Marijuana; Professional Challenges to the Nurse-Patient Relationship

      Ebersole, Nancy; Nowka, Scott; Dunnigan, Shea (2020-05-01)
      Prenatal counseling is imperative to ensure a safe and healthy pregnancy. With the recent change in legal status regarding marijuana in the United States, challenges for counseling have arose. It is important that healthcare providers are screening women for marijuana use during their prenatal visits, in order to initiate the proper counseling needed for their patients. Considering that THC, the main component in marijuana, can enter the fetal brain, it is crucial for healthcare providers to educate pregnant women on the effects that it can cause to their child. A systematic review of the literature was done using CINAHL database to identify the needs of pregnant women and the challenges to healthcare providers pertaining to marijuana use. The results of the studies showed that there are barriers related to counseling—how counseling is initiated, the quality of information provided by the healthcare team, and the perception of counseling. Counseling is not always initiated by the provider, whether they feel the patient is not using or because they do not want to deal with the legal and ethical issues of the situation if they are using. The information provided by the healthcare team lacks detail and quality, due to limited amount of research on the topic. Healthcare providers admit that they do not know what to tell their patients about marijuana use during pregnancy. Counseling did differ depending on whether the patient disclosed current or past marijuana use, which is why women fear telling their healthcare providers. More research must be done regarding how marijuana may affect the fetus and newborn. This information needs to be provided to obstetric healthcare workers, so that they can pass it on to their patients.
    • Preparedness and Risk Factors of Compassion Fatigue in Undergraduate Nursing Students

      Leger, Robin; Homan, Sara Marie (2016-04-01)
      The incidence of compassion fatigue is increasing among healthcare workers especially those who do not know what compassion fatigue is and have not developed healthy ways to cope with compassion fatigue. Unfamiliarity with compassion fatigue stems back to nursing school. Research has been done on what compassion fatigue is, its causes and coping mechanisms but there is limited research as to how compassion fatigue effects students or whether or not nursing school prepares students on how to combat compassion fatigue in high stress or difficult situations. The intended purpose of this study is to evaluate the risk factors of compassion fatigue in undergraduate nursing students and their preparedness to deal with compassion fatigue as novice nurses. Methods: The study was set up as a quantitative study of freshman, sophomore, junior and senior undergraduate nursing students in the Salem State University Nursing Program. The ten-question survey contained questions related to demographics, risk factors for compassion fatigue and preparedness. Results: Data was analyzed using SPSS. Of the 607 possible BSN students, 105 (18%) BSN students completed the survey. 0% of students reported having no stress while 67.7% of students reported having an above average to extreme stress. 43.2% of BSN students reported frequently or constantly being preoccupied with the stressors of others. 73.3% of students reported that they had never heard of the term compassion fatigue. 96.2% of students reported that they do not frequently take time to wind down and reflect after a stressful situation. Conclusion: In conclusion, the research clearly demonstrates that students are in need of further education regarding the risk of compassion fatigue and how to better prepare themselves. The undergraduate nursing student's reported having several risk factors already in place including high stress and ineffective coping. They also reported being unprepared to deal with challenging situations involving patients.
    • Putting A Stop to Nursing Burnout Before It Starts

      Ebersole, Nancy; Aymat, Alicia (2020-05-01)
      Burnout is defined as physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion. Nursing burnout is frequently seen within this profession. Questions have arisen on whether or not nursing burnout formulates during the working phase or before while attending nursing school. If students present signs and symptoms of nursing burnout during nursing school and before entering the professional field, these factors may predispose these new graduates to experience burnout earlier in their professional careers than new graduates who did not experience this. A systematic review of the literature was conducted. A Boolean search was used with the keywords: nursing burnout, nursing students, new graduate nurses, and nursing school. Six articles met the criteria for inclusion in this systematic review of the literature. Two themes were identified: emotional responses and coping skills, and emotional responses and year of study. The strength of a student’s coping skills is a consistent theme in each of the articles studied. The stress is not felt equally however within each year of a 4-year program. First and fourth year students report significantly less stress than those in their second and third year. Emotional exhaustion during the second and third years creates difficulties as the student prepares to enter professional practice in the fourth year. A process to recognize factors in a student, which predisposes them to burnout once they enter professional practice, is needed. In doing so, recognizing emotional exhaustion early will help students to develop stronger coping skills and promote behaviors that will lower the risk of burnout.
    • Risks and Benefits of Self-Diagnosis Using the Internet

      Fraley, Hannah; Gass, Meghan Alesia (2016-05-01)
      As technology use increases, self-diagnosis using a symptom checker on the World Wide Web has become a topic of discussion in the health field. Given that many in the United States continue without access to medical care, it is becoming common practice for patients to self-diagnose using information sought on the internet. Health literacy of internet health information is a concern, especially among vulnerable populations, such as immigrants and those without access to health insurance. The aim of this study is to understand the phenomenon of self-diagnosis using the internet as a source of health information among a convenience sample of Salem State University students (N= 150). A survey instrument was used to examine the following: perception of accurate health information sought throughout the internet; follow-up with primary physicians, how much trust is placed in internet self-diagnosis, and how often participants use the internet to self-diagnose. Data was analyzed using thematic coding methods. The internet provides us with access to information, yet among those seeking health-related information, there is a concern that critical health information can either be misinterpreted, unreliable or both. Self-diagnosis using the internet is a particular concern if patients are using the internet in the place of a physician. Results from this study can inform healthcare professionals about college faculty, staff and student perceptions regarding use of the internet to self-diagnose prior to seeing a primary physician, as well as inform future study of this phenomenon.
    • The Self-Reported Atitudes And Awareness Of Nurse Practitioners Towards Music Therapy

      Moske-Weber, Charlene; Nowka, Scott; Coles, William (2018-01-01)
      This study takes the anonymous report of nurse practitioners’ view of music therapy in adjunction with regular pharmacological care among Salem State nursing faculty who currently practice as a nurse practitioner. The study aims to gather awareness and attitudes of nurse practitioners toward using music therapy in their area of practice. There is a growing problem of prescription drug abuse that is sweeping the nation. One factor of this is the use of extremely strong and addictive pain medication used for overall healthy patients after postoperative surgery. Using music therapy in adjunction to pharmacological care helps patients deal with all the same problems of surgery like pain, anxiety, and worry while leaving out the harsh addictive qualities of only using pharmacologic medications. The study will involve an anonymous survey of questions addressing current practice habits of nurse practitioners among Salem State nursing faculty who are nurse practitioners, their level of awareness of music therapy, their personal attitudes towards music therapy as a complimentary alternative pain management approach. Additionally, I will seek to understand levels of attitudes towards music therapy in relationship to reported practice behavior.
    • Sexually Transmitted Infections in the Elderly: Nursing Implications for Prevention and Education

      Leger, Robin; Winslow, Catherine (2014-05-17)
      This study will examine why the elderly population in the United States is at high risk for contracting and spreading sexually transmitted diseases. Through a review of literature, many different risk factors will be identified and discussed. The study will also include methods of prevention to protect this population. Education strategies will also be discussed, not only for the members of the elderly population, but for the health care professionals who treat them. By identifying risk factors, providing education, and learning about prevention, the rate sexually transmitted diseases are being spread will decrease among the elderly population.
    • The Significance Of The Microbiome: It's Role In Infant Development And Long-Term Health

      Ebersole, Nancy; Haro, Lariza (2021-05-01)
      Humans enjoy a beneficial symbiotic relationship with bacteria. Although commonly thought to be the cause of illness, bacteria aid in food digestion along with creating resistance to disease. The microbiome refers to the aggregate of bacteria that reside in our intestinal track. There has been an effort over the past decade to map the human microbiome in order to identify this relationship. Given this crucial role of microbiota in human health, it is important to know how the microbiome is formed in infancy as it may impact one’s future ability to obtain wellness. A review of the literature was done to examine what is known of the microbiome at the earliest stage of life and the relationship to issues later in life. The articles were identified using the databases CINAHL, PubMed, and MEDLINE. Five themes were identified across the articles studied. The microbiome: (a) of preterm infants differs from full-term infants; (b) at birth is found in both the lungs and intestines; (c) development is affected by an infant’s intake of formula vs. breastmilk; (d) present and its amount present during infancy may influence the risk of developing behavioral issues; (e) development is altered when antibiotics are administered to newborns/infants. The choices of how a child will be fed is decided during pregnancy and consideration of the microbiome and its effect on future health has serious implications. Knowledge of the microbiome’s role in healthy growth and development should be considered when working with expectant mothers, parents and families of newborns.
    • Student Nurses' Knowledge of End-of-Life Treatment Options in Dementia Patients

      Fraley, Hannah; Coulter, Shelby Anne (2016-05-01)
      Dementia is a serious disease that affects 46.8 million elders globally with 9.9 million new cases each year. It is not often understood that dementia is considered a terminal illness, and it is thought that misconceptions about dementia may be a factor of poor quality of care for this vulnerable population at the end of their lives. Nurses are on the front lines of caring for dementia patients, however nurses may lack knowledge of how to best care for dementia patients and their families. A qualitative survey study will be conducted using a convenience sample of Salem State nursing students (N= 100). Specific study aims include: do nursing students know about dementia, advanced directives, and end of life care and treatment options specifically related to the dementia patient? Thematic coding methods will be used to analyze the data. Results from this study will help identify knowledge needs of nursing students related to end-of-life treatment for dementia patients. Understanding knowledge needs of nurses can further inform future educational programs for nursing students in order to increase the quality of care for this population.
    • Systematic Literature Review: A Family Approach to Postnatal Depression

      Campbell, Charlene; Swain, Charlene (2015-05-01)
      Through a systematic review of literature, this research project explores a family approach to postnatal depression (PND). Within the first year of giving birth, seven to 15 percent of woman experience postnatal depression. Postnatal depression does not solely affect new mothers, but also fathers and babies. In conducting a systematic review of Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Boston Public Library Electronic Resources, and Education Resources Information Centre Database (ERIC), along with Google and Google Scholar, nine peer-reviewed studies were ultimately selected for inclusion in this review. The systematic literature review revealed the benefits of a family approach to postnatal depression. Three main themes emerged from the research: 1) social and relationship support; 2) paternal PND; and 3) PND stigma. According to the results found in this review, teaching about PND should be focused on the all-new families in addition to the new mother. These results demonstrate teaching interventions should occur during the prenatal and postnatal time to reduce PND instances in both women and men.
    • Todos Estamos Satisfechos? Are We All Satisfied? A Review of the Literature

      Fraley, Hannah; Crampton, Taylor (2015-05-01)
      United States healthcare is experiencing a growing need for medical interpretation among diverse populations. Of note, the Hispanic population is steadily growing reaching upwards of 17% of the US population. The Hispanic patient experience and perception of care is poorly understood in the context of patient to provider communication in the US, despite 62% of Hispanics primarily speaking Spanish and limited English. A review of the literature was conducted, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) database was exhaustively searched for English language research published between 2000 and October 2014 that identified disparities between Spanish-speakers and English-speakers regarding their healthcare experiences. Keyword searches included the following: Spanish speaking patients, patient satisfaction, and health disparity. Of twenty-five articles initially yielded by the search strategy, seventeen articles were selected that met inclusion criteria for further analysis and review. Within these articles, it appeared that patients generally did experience a lower rate of satisfaction as compared to English-speaking patients regarding their healthcare providers and the language utilized. Contrastingly, an article described a population of Spanish-speaking patients whose language barrier was not reported as an issue when being assessed for domestic violence. Limited research exists which targets the Hispanic patient population and language barriers faced when communicating with their health care providers. This presents an important gap in the literature to consider for this patient population specifically their experiences and perceptions of how care is delivered in the US. Culturally relevant research is needed in order to appropriately change the way in which health care is delivered to this population, which will ultimately improve patient to provider communication and health literacy.
    • Treating Patients With Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP): The Challenges Of Implementing Nursing Bundles Of Care

      Ebersole, Nancy; Guzman, Emilee (2022-05-01)
      A ventilator is any device used to support, assist, or control respiration. Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) can result from long term mechanical ventilation and causes a major life-threatening infection that has a high prevalence in patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) within our hospitals today. Despite having life-saving benefits, mechanical ventilation puts patients at a high risk of developing VAP; this increases the length of hospital stay, increases the cost of treatment, and decreases patient quality of life. Therefore, hospitals have implemented standardized preventative care interventions or “bundles” for mechanically ventilated patients in attempts to reduce the overall VAP prevalence, and infection rate. A systemic literature review was performed using the CINAHL Plus database to investigate the challenges posed to nurses when implementing VAP care bundle interventions in ICU patients. Major themes are (a) VAP bundles significantly reduce days on a ventilator and days in the ICU, (b) What is in the care bundle matters, (c) Nursing compliance is related to education and years of experience, (d) Barriers to nursing adherence is related to the use of bundles, (e) Institutional barriers that affect nursing adherence to the use of bundles. The registered nurse is in a key position to mitigate the risk of VAP. Hospitals must provide standardized nursing policies that emerge from interpersonal communication with bedside nurses to enforce Evidence Based Practices. In the future, to provide optimal care for mechanically ventilated patients, hospitals must take action to create changes to overcome institutional barriers which impact patient care.
    • Undergraduate Nursing Students Attitudes Toward Physician Assisted Suicide

      Delis, Pamela; Lundblad, Kendyl (2018-01-01)
      Physician assisted suicide consists of a doctor providing a patient with the lethal means of a medication (usually the barbituate secobarbital) to administer themselves at their own will. Euthanasia is a slightly different form of physician assisted suicide, where the doctor takes an active role and administers the lethal dose of a medication (usually secobarbital) to the patient. As expected, this practice abounds with controversy. This research seeks to study baccalaureate student nurses’ opinions on physician assisted suicide. This research sought to understand if nursing students feel physician assisted suicide is ethical amongst certain situations, and whether or not they believe if it should be legalized in the United States. Using student nurses as the participants in this study seemed best because they most likely have, or will have, treated a critically or terminally ill patient. Nurses work the closest with these specific patients, and therefore their opinions on whether or not physician assisted suicide should be an option is extremely valuable. Survey methodology was used to conduct this research. The survey contained a few demographic questions and two scenarios for the students to state whether they agreed or not, and a space for their thoughts on the matter. Mostly all of the students, by the end of the survey, made it clear that they believe physician assisted suicide can and should be used within certain ethical situations.
    • Using the Ketogenic Diet to Reduce the Incidence of Pediatric Seizures: Helping Children and Families to Find a Better Quality of Life

      Ebersole, Nancy; Nowka, Scott; Gonsalves, Joanna; Wohler, Alison (2021-05-01)
      Seizure disorders have both medical as well as quality of life implications for anyone experiencing them. The use of medications to control and manage this disorder is not always effective and may cause side effects that discourage compliance with the prescribed drugs. All of these concerns are especially problematic for children with seizures and their families. The use of diet modifications to control seizures is showing promise as an alternative to medications. The high fat, ketogenic diet as well as the low glycemic index diet are being investigated to control seizures in children. A systematic review of the literature was done in the CINAHL Plus database. The themes identified across the studies are (a) the ketogenic diet was effective in reducing seizures whereas the low glycemic index diet was not; (b) compliance with diet changes is a significant concern in this patient population; (c) parents view quality of life differently than the children with seizure disorders and this can impact diet adherence; and (d) how this diet interacts with medications and alters other body functions must be considered when using the ketogenic diet for seizure management. These results indicate an opportunity for nurses to work with families and the health care team to reduce the incidence of seizures, improve treatment compliance, and enhance the quality of life. A treatment option which provides for the needs and desires of both the individual and the parents can strengthen the family unit and promote healthy outcomes for all.
    • Vaccines And The Evolution Of Society's Attitudes Toward Them: Implications For Future Nursing Practice

      Campbell, Charlene; Nowka, Scott; Shutt, Briana (2017-04-01)
      The various controversies surrounding vaccines are a pertinent topic in our society today and have increased fear related to immunization. Despite advances in medicine and the development of life-saving vaccines, diseases that were thought to be long gone have crept back into our society and become a public health concern once again. As the anti-vaccination movement gains momentum and parents choose not to vaccinate their children, there are increasing numbers of reported cases of once-eradicated diseases like Pertussis and Measles. A systematic literature review was done to explore immunizations and the evolution of their impact on society as well as to identify vaccine-related fears and their validity. Using Nola Pender’s Health Promotion Model as a theoretical framework, the goal of this review was to discuss implications for future nursing practice and to identify possible interventions for decreasing immunization fears.
    • Young Women With A Diagnosis Of Sarcoma: Decisions Related To Disease Treatment And Infertility Options

      Campbell, Charlene; Murungi, Sheilla (2019-05-01)
      Women suffering from sarcoma are often presented with the devastating news that they may experience infertility during or after chemotherapy and radiation treatment for the disease. Because of this, they must make the difficult decision to either go through with the treatments or explore options to preserve their fertility. Many of these women may be planning to have a family with biological children but undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatment might make those plans impossible. This study examined therapeutic advances for preserving fertility in women while maintaining a therapeutic regimen for treatment of the disease. This research also examined the extent to which these patients have a full understanding of these treatments and if they are adequately informed of all of the available options from which to choose. This comprehensive review of the literature examined the psychological effects of potential infertility resulting from sarcoma treatment on women (18-44 years old) and their families. This study also explored the resources available to patients suffering from psychological effects of sarcoma treatment and infertility and the efficacy of these resources. The overall purpose of this study was to further examine the possible treatment options for these patients with an emphasis on the methods and resources to help them navigate this devastating diagnosis.