• Communication Techniques Used by Medical and Surgical Nurses to Communicate with Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

      Frost, Marion; Mathieu, Chelsea (2014-05-17)
      Through the process of a literature review and an online survey of medical and surgical nurses currently working in the hospital environment, this study investigates “Techniques Used by Medical and Surgical Nurses to Communicate with Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease.” The literature review covers current research explaining how Alzheimer’s disease affects a person’s ability to verbally communicate and ability to understand verbal communication. The research also covers the most effective communication techniques to utilize when communicating with a person with Alzheimer’s disease. Nurses in the medical and surgical fields have been given an online survey which includes demographic information, scenarios, and various communication techniques that could be implemented when talking to someone with Alzheimer’s disease. The information from the online survey has been analyzed for trends to show if nurses are using the proper techniques when communicating or if they are following the misconceptions. This study contributes to an area of research that is lacking information, as well as explores if medical and surgical nurses are communicating effectively with an ever growing population of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
    • Information Available to Patients Diagnosed with Dementia: Interviews With Caregivers and Their Experiences

      Fraley, Hannah; Williams, Leigh (2015-05-01)
      Purpose: Dementia is a prevalent problem for older adults and their families. Early intervention and a multidisciplinary approach for treatment have been linked to better quality of life. The primary objective of this study was to discover what information is available to patients with dementia upon diagnosis and how beneficial the information given is perceived by the primary caregivers. Secondary objectives included types of resources most utilized by the caregiver and how caregivers found out about such resources. Methods: A qualitative study design was employed using snowball sampling methods and semi-structured interviews among primary caregivers (n= 5) of patients with Alzheimer’s Disease (n= 3), Lewy Body Dementia (n= 1), and Dementia Unspecified (n= 1) respectively. Thematic coding methods were used to identify potential barriers to accessing timely information regarding disease prognosis and optimal resources. Results: Several themes emerged from caregiver interviews. Central themes found among the caregivers include: 1.) chronic grief 2.) chronic frustrations 3.) chronic guilt 4.) total responsibility of care. Several subthemes emerged that compound upon these caregiver experiences including provider related parries such as lack of quality information, and access barriers including difficulty finding community resources. Conclusion: Caregivers interviewed in this study perceive support from their health care team in general, yet have limited perceived support in navigating how to access community resources. Patients and their families need guidance and support from the health care team upon diagnosis, yet also need ongoing support and education while caring for a loved one with Dementia.