Recent Submissions

  • An Institute-Based Approach to OER in Digital Caribbean Studies

    Valens, Keja; Collins, Perry; Huet, Hélène; Taylor, Laurie; Mistretta, Brittany; Toombs, Hannah; Baksh, Anita; Dize, Nathan H.; Glenn-Callender, Juliet; Johnson, Ronald Angelo; et al. (ACRL, 2022)
    In May 2019, more than forty educators, scholars, and librarians came together for a week-long workshop to collaboratively explore the potential—and the limitations—of digital pedagogies within Caribbean Studies. Hosted by the University of Florida (UF) and the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), “Migration, Mobility, Sustainability: Caribbean Studies & Digital Humanities” delved into digital projects amplifying community narratives across the Caribbean diaspora, low-barrier tools to enable student-instructor co-creation, and efforts to subvert colonialist legacies as we build and describe digital collections. This face-to-face experience offered a rich starting point for a two-year institute that fostered virtual dialogue, course development, and publication of a contextualized selection of open educational resources (OER). With a multi-institutional, international group of participants working across the Caribbean and the United States, institute leaders took a flexible approach to topical coverage, schedule, and anticipated outcomes that invited individual perspectives and experience to shape the conversation. This approach drove the capacious framing of OER, continued in this chapter, simply as content available freely online and useful to teachers and students. Rather than attempting to normalize vocabulary or prescriptively define what might “count” as an OER, the institute broadly encouraged knowledge-sharing around access to digital collections, technology, and models for leveraging both in the classroom. Presentations on courses and projects served as boundary objects, offering common ground where participants could explore potential next steps and opportunities for collaboration from multiple vantage points. This chapter focuses on the institute as a case study for OER development that centers relationship-building, lived experience, empathy, and flexibility as foundational principles, grounded in feminist approaches to digital pedagogy. Attention to social justice permeates this work, both in amplifying Caribbean voices across the diaspora and in leveraging approaches in the digital humanities (DH) that call on students to challenge reductive or colonialist perspectives. These values mirror those embodied by participants’ own research and teaching, and the following sections draw heavily on the publicly available reflections, syllabi, assignments, and other materials they contributed.
  • Sapphic Conceptions Of The Muse

    Valens, Keja; Giroux, Brittany (2022-05-01)
    From Dante to Gertrude Stein, some of the most prominent artists have found inspiration in another. This thesis explores what it is to be a muse and the role compulsory heterosexuality has in the conception of the passive muse in text as well as narrative cinema. Utilizing Audre Lorde's biomythography Zami a New Spelling of my Name and the film Portrait of Lady on Fire, I explore how these artists conceive of their muses. The difference between the passive muse conception and the various conceptions of these artists is necessary. Since the parameters of the passive muse conception do not account for women as content creators, much less lesbians as content creators, these artists cannot participate it in seeing as the convection doe not encompass them. Moreover, in this text and film, the muses experience the antithetical process to that of the passive muse. Which is to say they go from being an object in many regards to a subject. These works rely heavily on overarching themes of solidarity and the artists’ conception of their muses as extensions of themselves.
  • Scar Of Nox

    Carey, Kevin; Scrimgeour, J.D.; Hughes, Miranda (2021-12)
    After witnessing her Papa's soul ripped from his body by the Unhallowed worshippers of the underGod, Nox has undergone the rigorous training of the Divine Shadows, an elite and secret force run by the Church of Adonex, god of Afterlifes. Fueled by the desire to free him, she prepares for the Rite of Death, the ritual that will give her incredible power. Before she can do that, she must overcome two obstacles--balancing her mistrust and fear of Adonex, the god who scarred her face the night Papa was taken, and learning to get along with her Tomas, her newest and most stubborn scholar-in-training yet. Follow Nox into the darkness as she hunts the Unhallowed, their Desecrated victims, and the truth behind the events that changed her life forever. This thesis is an exercise in writing for young adult audiences and exploring the use of fantasy as a way of discussing deeper topics. Nox herself is an exploration into the mind of a young woman facing trauma and pursuing closure that forces her to constantly choose between giving respite to the dead or saving the living, representing the often-difficult battle of attempting to overcome the past and plan for the future at the same time, a struggle I believe many readers can relate to.
  • A Key Without A Lock

    Carey, Kevin; DeCiccio, Albert; Quackenbush, William (2021)
    The first five chapters from the book A Key Without A Lock.
  • Emotional Flashbacks

    Scrimgeour, J.D.; Hughes, Courtney (2022)
    A collection of non-fiction poetry and prose that focuses on enduring and overcoming emotional trauma.
  • Journeying Through The In-Between: An Exploration Of Liminality In José Saramago’sblindness, All The Names, And The Cave

    Valens, Keja; Miller, Evan (2022-05)
    This thesis focuses on the concept of liminality and the presence of liminal states in José Saramago’s trilogy of novels, Blindness, All the Names, and The Cave. Defined by qualities of disorientation and ambiguity, liminality speaks to being in a state of “in-between,” which, I argue, is applicable to the central characters in each of these texts. Specifically, I examine how Saramago’s characters experience these liminal states, as well the qualities of the liminal states themselves, which share many - though not all - of the same characteristics as labyrinths and caves. To that end, I trace the liminal journeys of the central characters in each novel, the actions required to successfully complete their journeys, and how the culmination of these journeys manifest as an achievement of change engendered by realization, epiphany, and clarity of consciousness. This thesis is divided into three chapters, bookended by introduction and conclusion. In the first chapter, I detail the history of liminality and define the “liminal state” and “liminal subject.” I also discuss how Saramago’s characters can be considered liminal subjects, and the events that precipitate the characters’ entrances into their respective liminal states. The second chapter features the analysis of the beginning stages of the characters’ liminal journeys - the “descents into darkness and the “confrontations with death” - and introduces the concept of “concentric liminality,” as well as the parallels between liminality and symbolic existence. The third chapter explores the final stage of the liminal journey, the “ascension to light,” and the processes by which the characters can achieve their transformations and exit their liminal states.
  • Exploratory Theatrics: Muriel Spark's Treatment Of A Woman's Absurd In The Driver's Seat, Memento Mori, And "The Portobello Road"

    Valens, Keja; Escobar-Leswell, Chantelle (2022-05)
    Muriel Spark is sharp in her wit and delivery. She has been known to ‘hold her own’ among male writers of the contemporaneous period -- no small feat. for a woman who came of age in the 1930s. She writes dark -- veering towards sinister -- novels, novellas, and short stories, but what is striking about each of them is her uncanny ability to portray the absurd, a field rarely penetrated by women at all. In the chosen texts, Spark creates at once a sense of agency for the women characters, and an overarching lack of control over the universe in which they exist. Using select feminist theory alongside critical analyses of the absurd, this thesis aims to illuminate the ways Spark’s unique storytelling creates space for women in male-dominated terrain. This includes both the arena in which she chose to write, and in the circumstances she sets up for her characters.
  • Mosaics Of Wholeness: Healing Through Queer Indigenous Self-Telling In Billy-Ray Belcourt’s A History Of My Brief Body And Deborah A. Miranda’s Bad Indians

    Valens, Keja; Cook, Jessica (2022-05)
    This thesis examines texts by two queer Indigenous writers, Billy-Ray Belcourt (Driftpile Cree) and Deborah A. Miranda (Ohlone/Costanoan Esselen), to consider how writing about the self—what the Western literary canon commonly terms “memoir” or “autobiography”—is a form of healing in the afterlife of settler-colonialism. Through close readings of Belcourt’s essay collection A History of My Brief Body and Miranda’s Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir, this thesis explores how Belcourt and Miranda both invent and reclaim the Indigenous self through the construction of metaphorical mosaics which, in their assembled wholeness, reflect a kind of “living through” of colonialism. Within this framework, this thesis goes on to argue that the stories of the self crafted by Belcourt and Miranda effectively reconstruct the queer Indigenous embodied self, writing against the colonial imagination with assertions of non-heteronormative sexual desire.
  • English Language Ideologies in ELT: Presence and Practices in Oaxaca, Mexico

    González, Melanie; Bustamante Martínez, Esaú Israel (2021-10)
    As the English language continues to expand globally, studies have found that socially constructed beliefs and ideological values around the role and status of English greatly influence the institutional policies and practices of English language teaching (ELT) programs. This study describes the findings of a phenomenological study conducted among EFL educators in Oaxaca, Mexico regarding the presence of English language ideologies in ELT programs. Findings revealed that sociocultural, linguistic, and economic ideologies affect institutional policies, access, and representation. Takeaways from this study suggest that English language ideologies impact institutional and programmatic practices in ways that relate to educational access, hiring practices, native speakerism, and an asymmetry between public and private educational systems.
  • Stories: Creating and Mirroring Community

    Valens, Keja; Eshelman, Sarah (2021-12)
    This is the portfolio of my work throughout my master’s program. I highlight five projects where I explored community as it is depicted or described in literature. I end with a final paper exploring how literature itself can be a connecting point for community in the real world through studying the work of Dawnland Voices. In my projects, I considered: community of a nation as formed by literature (examining Winthrop’s “Model of Christian Charity” and Harjo’s American Sunrise; community as a source and subject of healing in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony; community formed over shared meals in young adult literature; community as found family in television shows; community and perspective in the classroom; and community seeking its own thriving through literature and social media.
  • Emotional Flashbacks

    Scrimgeour, J.D.; Hughes, Courtney (2022)
    A collection of non-fiction poetry and prose that focuses on enduring and overcoming emotional trauma.
  • From The Inside (A Collection of Personal Essays)

    Scrimgeour, J.D.; O'Day, Joseph (2021-12)
    I’ve always favored nonfiction stories that roused my emotions and curiosity, and compelled me to scrutinize every sentence and word for meaning. Such stories often awakened memories of my own that I’d treasured but had allowed to fade. In my own writing of essays, I’ve found myself reviewing old photos and mementos, taking trips to the local library, comparing my remembrances with those of relatives and friends. I hope readers will see in these essays something familiar and perhaps revive hidden, cherished memories from their own lives. Versions of these essays have appeared in the following publications: “Hallmark Moment” and “My Precious Stuff,” Biostories; “324 Bridge Street,” The Salem News; “Unrecognized” (under the title “Healthcare Unseen”), Focus on Faulkner; and “Rousing Bits of Assorted Wholes,” Adelaide Literary Magazine.
  • Streaming Consciousness: Treading the Conceptual Rapids of Psychological Theory

    Noonan, Anne; Hayden, Felicia Marie (2016-05-01)
    This thesis is the first section in a book length project. The aim of this thesis is to explore the relationship between the academic field of psychology and the creative nature of the field. Through use of memoir, detail, and conscious experience, this thesis is a contemporary interpretation of the theories of Sigmund Freud.
  • Pleasure and Pain in Charlotte Bronte's Villette and Jane Eyre

    Mulman, Lisa; Frank, Tirzah (2016-05-01)
    Like every character, Lucy Snowe and Jane Eyre, respective protagonists of Charlotte Brontë's Villette and Jane Eyre, grapple with pursuing pleasure and avoiding pain. Pleasure and pain are unavoidable universals, of course, but everyone treats their own pleasure and pain differently. Furthermore, pleasure and pain do not exist in a vacuum; there are other considerations—such as morality, self-respect, and lack of absolute control—that affect how each person treats and prioritizes them. Lucy and Jane, in particular, are not hedonists, so when looking at how they pursue pleasure and avoid pain, it is also important to account for the things that they care about more than either. Examining how Brontë's heroines approach pleasure and pain in relation to other facets of their lives reveals their priorities, an understanding of which is essential to understanding their choices and burgeoning selfhood.
  • Navigating My Life: Memoirs of a College Student

    Flynn, Regina; Danca, Lisa Ashley (2016-05-01)
    For many students, college is one of the most defining times in a person's life. With the overarching theme of coming-of-age, this collection of creative nonfiction essays details the author's personal development during her college years. The pieces are centered on experiences, including her time spent as an orientation leader, her travels to Europe and the Northeastern United States, and her coverage of a political rally.
  • The Whale as an Object: Examining the Subject/Object Relationship in Herman Melville's Moby Dick

    Riss, Arthur; Bennett, Julia (2016-05-01)
    Hieroglyphic images appear recurrently throughout the text of Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. Whether the marks in question are ancient Egyptian ciphers, Queequeg’s cryptic tattoos, or scars on the backs of whales, Melville claims all are hieroglyphical. This project will examine Melville’s use of hieroglyphics in Moby Dick to broach debates about what language is and how it gets its meaning. Do words have intrinsic significance, or is their significance supplied by the reader alone? Are all—or any—hieroglyphics decipherable? What could ancient Egyptian figures have in common with the “hieroglyphic” scratches on whales? This project will engage with John T. Irwin’s American Hieroglyphics, perhaps the most notable work to use the hieroglyphic in raising questions of meaning and interpretation. Additionally, the project will incorporate works by John Searle and Walter Benn Michaels to explore different accounts of what language is, what texts count as language, and how language becomes meaningful.
  • The Rebirth of Chile in Relation to Childbirth and Female Pain

    Valens, Keja; Carella, Melissa (2013-01-01)
    Chilean novelists Isabel Allende and Diamela Eltit wrote during a time in which Augusto Pinochet’s reign created chaos within the government and suffering for its citizens. In the works The House of the Spirits by Allende and The Fourth World by Eltit, emphasis is placed on the female characters’ inability to have full freedom of speech, and also how the burdens of conceiving a child and giving birth became not just an infliction upon their bodies but upon their existence as women in a disadvantaged society. By analyzing the conceptions, pregnancies, and births of various characters in the novels while referencing how society treated women during Pinochet’s dictatorship, this paper will reveal that childbirth is used as a metaphor for the birth of a new Chile.
  • One- A Collection of Poetry

    Peary, Alexandria; Huang, Chengyu (2015-05-01)
    This poetry collection - One - records touching moments in my life, the sparkles of my thoughts. This project consists of twenty-one poems along with a table of contents, foreword, introduction, acknowledgements and notes. It is broken down into four different sections titled Hazy/Mist, Things Remembered, Hallucinating and Trigger. The title of the poetry collection was chosen as "one" because I wanted to convey that everyone's life is unique. Like the gambling game with fate, you'll never know what will happen in the next second. With specific rules of the usage of imagery, metaphors, and similes, and musical rhythms, my poetry style contains not only Chinese styles but also other Western free art forms.
  • Unreal Magazine: A Feminist Magazine Dedicated to Women in Music

    Glasser, Perry; Vinciguerra, Lauren (2015-05-01)
    The basis of this project was to create an online magazine geared towards the subject of women in music. In today's society, women are still seen and treated as second-class citizens. In particular, women are considered to be less talented and are typically taken less-seriously than their male counterparts. Because of this, it is important to showcase female musicians in a strong, empowering light in order to show and fix the sexism and misconstrued ideals in today's society. For this project, I read both music and feminist publications in order to better understand the subject matters and industries. I had to continually stay up-to-date with music blogs and websites in order to discover new music and artists that would complement my magazine. The end result was an e-zine that showcased female musicians in a positive light. I made sure to write each article so females were portrayed as accomplished, hard-working, and unique members of the music industry and society as a whole. Seeing all these articles together in a cohesive manner made it clear that misogyny is apparent and impossible to ignore in today's society. Creating a visual representation of influential women will encourage both women and men to pursue their passions despite obstacles and challenges. The e-zine can be found at: http://unrealzine.wix.com/unreal
  • William Butler Yeats: Nationalism, Mythology, and the New Irish Tradition

    Elia, Richard; Welch, Samuel N. (2015-05-01)
    William Butler Yeats has been regarded as one of the most important poets of the modern era. His poetry is known throughout the world for its attention to form, masterful imagery, and its distinctly Irish nature. Always a patriot, much of Yeats’ life was devoted to the resurrection of Irish culture in what he hoped would be a Celtic Renaissance free from the heavily political implications of the Irish nationalist movement of his time. This essay seeks to discuss and understand Yeats’ methods and inspirations behind conveying his nationalism and love of Irish lore through his poetry, especially in his earlier years of publication. He was concerned not just with people’s knowledge of Ireland and her storied past, but also with the cultural wellbeing of Ireland’s future, especially when it came to fostering future Irish artists and creative types. This essay examines seven works by Yeats organized into three sections, each individual section representing a different point in his creative journey towards finding his voice for Ireland’s future writers and artists. His hope was to foster the creation of a literary tradition that was Irish in its roots for the entertainment, advancement, and representation of a thoroughly Irish people. This paper seeks to discover how exactly he went about attempting to create such a tradition.

View more