Now showing items 1-20 of 323

    • An Institute-Based Approach to OER in Digital Caribbean Studies

      Valens, Keja; Collins, Perry; Huet, Hélène; Taylor, Laurie; Mistretta, Brittany; Toombs, Hannah; Baksh, Anita; Dize, Nathan H.; Glenn-Callender, Juliet; Johnson, Ronald Angelo; et al. (ACRL, 2022)
      In May 2019, more than forty educators, scholars, and librarians came together for a week-long workshop to collaboratively explore the potential—and the limitations—of digital pedagogies within Caribbean Studies. Hosted by the University of Florida (UF) and the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), “Migration, Mobility, Sustainability: Caribbean Studies & Digital Humanities” delved into digital projects amplifying community narratives across the Caribbean diaspora, low-barrier tools to enable student-instructor co-creation, and efforts to subvert colonialist legacies as we build and describe digital collections. This face-to-face experience offered a rich starting point for a two-year institute that fostered virtual dialogue, course development, and publication of a contextualized selection of open educational resources (OER). With a multi-institutional, international group of participants working across the Caribbean and the United States, institute leaders took a flexible approach to topical coverage, schedule, and anticipated outcomes that invited individual perspectives and experience to shape the conversation. This approach drove the capacious framing of OER, continued in this chapter, simply as content available freely online and useful to teachers and students. Rather than attempting to normalize vocabulary or prescriptively define what might “count” as an OER, the institute broadly encouraged knowledge-sharing around access to digital collections, technology, and models for leveraging both in the classroom. Presentations on courses and projects served as boundary objects, offering common ground where participants could explore potential next steps and opportunities for collaboration from multiple vantage points. This chapter focuses on the institute as a case study for OER development that centers relationship-building, lived experience, empathy, and flexibility as foundational principles, grounded in feminist approaches to digital pedagogy. Attention to social justice permeates this work, both in amplifying Caribbean voices across the diaspora and in leveraging approaches in the digital humanities (DH) that call on students to challenge reductive or colonialist perspectives. These values mirror those embodied by participants’ own research and teaching, and the following sections draw heavily on the publicly available reflections, syllabi, assignments, and other materials they contributed.
    • French Canadian Folktales

      Gross, Benjamin; Blood, Elizabeth; Stickney, Samantha (2022-05-01)
      Study something you care about, learn everything you can, and do your best work. Whether your passion is in mathematics, dance, or architecture, I’ve always been a firm believer that choosing to study something you love will make your university days immeasurably more fulfilling. My thesis titled “French Canadian Folktales” is a testament to this philosophy, as it is a marriage of the invaluable passions I’ve accrued during my time as a student: printmaking and French. My goal for this thesis was to create a highly collaborative experience that incorporates these two passions in a way that showcases both my translation and my studio time. Therefore, the following is the result of two semesters’ work crafting print illustrations under my thesis advisor, Professor Benjamin Gross. The translations were completed over three years with Professor Elizabeth Blood, alongside nine students of French: Kristen Burgess, Bayron Contreras, Patrick Delva, Sage Grant, Samantha Gurney, Raymond Harris, Rachael Kuper, Anna Snyder, and myself. The result is a collection of fifteen folktales from 19th century Québécois writers that undergraduate students and faculty have translated from French into English. All folktales have been assembled into a book and accompanied by my original prints. Through this project, may you not only find these stories amusing but also be able to experience the culture and literature of folktales from French-speaking Québec. Bonne lecture!
    • Kathrine Thomas Photography: A Business Rebrand

      Vincent, Cindy; Thomas, Kathrine (2022-05-01)
      When you think of a company, you most likely picture their logo in your head. Having a recognizable brand is something that sets a business apart from others. This thesis focuses on rebranding my business, Kathrine Thomas Photography in order to appear more appealing and cohesive. This thesis examines the successes, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats my business faces with a SWOT analysis, and identifies current communication tactics and evaluates market competition in a situation analysis. This study also incorporates a survey of current clients to understand preferred communication modalities. As a result of this research, my website is now easier to navigate and informs potential clients about what it is like to work with me. I also created a brand identity kit that includes a color palette and typefaces to serve as a guide for my business. Overall, this research serves as a resource for small business owners in rebranding their own business. Website can be found at: www.kathrinethomasphotography.com
    • Don't Tread On Climate Policy: American Nationalism And U.S. Climate Policy

      Silvern, Steven; Wolongevicz, Joey (2022-05-01)
      The United States has a turbulent relationship with both domestic and international climate change policy, fueled by American nationalism. While there are robust fields of research on both nationalism and climate policy separately, research on connections between the two has only just begun in the past few years. When that scope is further narrowed to specifically American nationalism and U.S. climate policy, the field becomes even more sparse. I argue that this void in the conversation is a significant grey area that gives anti-climate actors particular power in determining the fate of U.S. climate policy. Utilizing messaging that plays to the political hegemony of American nationalism has enabled anti-climate actors to kill, weaken, or delay indefinitely a number of important pieces of climate policy. In this paper I will compare and contrast four such policies: the Kyoto Protocol, the American Clean Energy and Security Act (cap and trade), The Clean Power Plan, and The Paris Agreement. I will identify a thread of common themes through each policy, including organized American nationalists, anti-globalism nationalist messaging, American nationalism in electoral politics, mistrust of the United Nations, and examples of American exceptionalism and isolationism. In an age where we have dwindling time to mitigate the worst effects of the climate crisis, understanding the systemic role ideologies like American nationalism play in disrupting climate policy is crucial.
    • A Literature Review Of Alternative Approaches To Escape Extinction In Feeding Protocols

      Gonsalves, Joanna; Setzer, Olivia (2022-05-01)
      This literature review investigated different treatment packages for feeding protocols in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A literature review was conducted on case studies that were conducted on children under the age of eighteen with at least one problem behavior related to feeding. The case studies included were peer-reviewed and published in a journal article in the past twelve years. The review considered a set of variables for each study that included: the number of children who were treated, the effectiveness of the treatment, consistency of results between participants, consistency of results across studies, and follow up treatment effectiveness. Based on the literature reviewed, the results indicated there was no single treatment package that consistently demonstrates a decrease in inappropriate mealtime behavior and an increase in acceptable mealtime behavior. High probability sequences, noncontingent reinforcement, behavioral skills training, least-to-most prompting, and lag schedules of reinforcement were at least moderately effective at decreasing inappropriate mealtime behavior and increasing appropriate mealtime behavior without using escape extinction.
    • The Intersection Of The Head And The Heart: A Playwright’s Journey In Logic And Emotion

      Cunningham, William; Rossmeisl, Stephanie (2022-05-01)
      Logic and emotion are often seen as antithetical. In most people’s minds, the former connects to the scientific, the mathematical, the intellectual, the objective, and the tangible, while the latter relates to the artistic, the ethical, the subjective, the spiritual, and the intangible. In my process journal, I use my original full-length play, The Intersection of The Head and The Heart, as a means to explore these human qualities’ roles in arguably theatre’s foremost topic of examination: the shared human experience. This ultimately examines whether or not an effective intersection between the two even exists. A detailed breakdown and analysis of the play, as well as commentary on my sources of inspiration, techniques, and overall process from writing to performance, demonstrates how the intersection can be examined, both during the process and in the finished product. Finally, I conclude with my personal, academic, and artistic growth over the years. Particular consideration is given to how this is all a greater reflection of my own life experiences.
    • Betting Just Got Easier: The Power Of Machine Learning And Making Predictions

      Nafa, Fatema; Ngandjui, Johnson (2022-05-01)
      There comes a time in your life when you have endeavored to place a wager, whether minuscule or astronomically immense the goal is to victoriously triumph. What if you knew the chances of you winning? In this project, I analyzed The Big Five European soccer leagues data where I predict the probability of what team will win using various machine learning techniques while answering questions to maximize the accuracy of my prediction. The project drives away from the rigorous concepts of numbers, with a visual representation of the analytics. This breaks away from the extensive data into a more conceptualized aspect of betting. Many Bettors bet based on favorites, is that a valid way to place a bet? The first phase of this project is creating a descriptive analysis for understanding the data, the second phase is diving into support vector machines, random forest, and Xgboost to organize data elements and standardize how the data elements relate to one another to answer questions pertaining to wager making. I will make use of PySpark to show distinction between supervised learning models. The complex components will follow a sequential design metric to understand correctly how to maximize your bet. The results will consist of a prototype web application with a descriptive analysis of my findings, this includes betting prediction on my data. Users will get a deep understanding on why the results presented as they did.
    • An Investigation Into The Role Of Gamma Oscillations In Alzheimer's Disease And Future Treatment Options

      Chen, Changqing; Moge, Serena (2022-05-01)
      Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and involves the deterioration of memory and other important cognitive functions. Despite 1 in 3 seniors dying from AD or another form of dementia, there still remains no cure. An accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques and tau protein aggregates are what characterize AD. There have been medicines developed that target Aβ and tau protein in order to improve symptoms, but these can neither stop nor delay the progression of AD. Instead, most of the medicines available only aid in symptom control and patient comfort. Researchers have begun to search for new theories of pathogenesis, which may assist in creating new treatments that might cure this disease. One novel area of research in this field is the role of gamma oscillations. It is believed that a disruption in gamma brain waves could be a cause of the formation of Aβ and tau protein aggregation. Although changes in gamma wave activity have been linked to several neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, treatments that restore gamma oscillations to their normal activity have not been investigated widely. The goal of this research is to investigate the current knowledge on AD pathogenesis and treatments, with special emphasis on the impact of gamma oscillations and the exploration of treatments that target restoration of gamma waves.
    • Silly Rabbit, Manipulative Marketing Tactics Are For Kids! – Exploring The Effectiveness Of Ethical Children's Cereal Packaging

      Alves, Brian; Malloy, Mark; Melin, Erin (2022-05-01)
      Through packaging design, designers visually communicate the personality, feel, and quality of a product to potential consumers. When analyzing packaging in the cereal industry, there is a clear line drawn between the playful visual style of cereal targeted at children, and the mature visual style of cereal targeted at adults. Although children’s cereal products are being advertised successfully, the majority of products themselves are often high in sugar, contain artificial flavoring, and include other non-beneficial ingredients. Healthy children’s cereal products rarely receive the same level of engaging and story driven branding that competing unhealthy brands receive. Thus, unethical design standards are used to capitalize off of young children who are unable to fully comprehend advertising efforts. Rather than using design to persuade children into becoming consumers of unhealthy cereal products, the author explored the effects of these tactics when applied to a healthier alternative. She hypothesized that if influential design tactics from unhealthy cereal brands were applied to the packaging of a healthier cereal product, then children may feel visually influenced to try better-for-you options. The author gathered research related to children’s marketing tactics, used her findings to redesign a healthy cereal product, and conducted in person mini-interviews with elementary aged children to test her design against competing brands. Her primary hypothesis was supported, suggesting that children find healthier options with engaging packaging more appetizing and interesting that traditional healthy options. As a result of her study, the author hopes to highlight the importance of ethical design application, and in doing so, encourage positive change within the graphic design and children’s consumer goods industries.
    • A Poke And Prod Into The Attitudes Of College-Aged Students Towards The COVID-19 Vaccine

      Leong, Pamela; Moore, Sara; McCarthy, Morgan (2022-05-01)
      This research investigates the attitudes of college-aged students towards the COVID-19 vaccine. The prediction is that vaccine hesitancy towards the COVID-19 vaccines that exists in the college-aged population is due to misinformation, distrust in vaccines, and being uninformed. To test this hypothesis, a survey was conducted collecting information regarding vaccines and the COVID-19 pandemic from Salem State University students. The results could not confirm the hypothesis since no significant relationships were found due to limitations of the study. Although the hypothesis of this research could not be confirmed, this research provides a foundation for future research that may provide further insight into vaccine hesitancy in the college- aged student population.
    • New Constraints On Formation Of Orthogneiss In Southern Adirondacks Using Integrated Analysis Methods Of Petrology, Zircon U-Pb Geochronology And Whole Rock Geochemistry

      Toraman, Erkan; McCaffery, Kyle (2022-05-01)
      The Adirondack Mountains (ADK) form the southern part of the Grenville Province, a poly-deformed orogenic complex formed in the Mesoproterozoic during the formation of Rodinia. The ADK is subdivided into two domains, separated by the Carthage-Colton Mylonite Zone. The Lowlands are characterized by upper amphibolite-facies metasedimentary rocks, including marbles, evaporites, and volcanic units, whereas the Highlands are formed by granulite-facies meta igneous rocks and anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite magmatic complex. A large suite of granulite-facies orthogneisses exposed in the Southern Highlands yields the oldest (>1.3 Ga) ages, however, those ages come from a limited number of outcrops. We present new petrological, geochemical, and geochronological results from several quartzofeldspatic orthogneiss units to better document the timing and tectonic setting of these rocks. All samples are mainly composed of quartz, felspar, biotite, pyroxene, and opaque minerals. Foliation and lineation are defined by elongated quartz ribbons and feldspar grains, or biotite laminae. High-temperature microstructures, such as flame perthites in feldspars or checkerboard extinction in quartz are commonly observed in thin sections. Major element analyses show that samples have calc-alkaline affinities, suggesting an arc environment. U-Pb zircon geochronology produced two age groups. 1150 Ma ages which are Shawinigan and 1350 Ma ages which are associated with pre-orogenic magmatism. Based on whole rock geochemistry the Shawinigan age rocks are associated with within plate magmatism and the 1350 Ma pre-orogenic magmatism is associated with magmatic arc activity.
    • Social Isolation And Loneliness In The COVID-19 Pandemic

      Krugman, Martin; Lee, Emma (2022-05-01)
      The COVID-19 pandemic is a problem that the world has been facing for just about two and a half years. During this time, governments around the world implemented a variety of mandates – most prevalently lockdowns, quarantines, and other social isolation guidelines – in an attempt to curtail the spread of COVID-19. It makes intuitive sense to expect social isolation to have impacted loneliness levels in the general adult population during the first year of the pandemic, when social isolation related guidelines were widespread. Thus, the present study sought to conduct a search and review of the psychological literature related to the impact of social isolation and other related variables on loneliness in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Psychological databases and studies’ reference sections were searched until a pool of 11 studies was formed. Aside from loneliness, variables that were examined as predictors of loneliness in at least five of the 11 studies were chosen for discussion in the present literature review. Ultimately, it was found that loneliness was high and widespread during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, and that a number of sociodemographic variables were risk factors for loneliness during this time. However, there were some contradictory findings in the studies regarding whether or not loneliness increased in the general population during this time. Thus, further longitudinal research investigating this phenomenon is warranted.
    • Tiny Earth: Studentsourcing Antibiotic Discovery

      Sprenkle, Amy; Marashio, Kristina (2022-05-01)
      There is a dire need for new antibiotics to treat antibiotic resistant bacterial infections. With the assistance of the course-based research experience Tiny Earth, isolates of antibiotic-producing bacteria discovered in BIO 304 Microbiology & Its Applications during Spring 2021 at Salem State University will be further characterized. This characterization may include performing 16S rDNA PCR identification of soil isolates, characterization of the secondary metabolites from these isolates by chemical extraction and testing the metabolites on ESKAPE safe relatives to confirm growth inhibitory activity, and testing the chemical extracts on eukaryotic systems, namely cultured mammalian cells for cytotoxic effects. The ultimate goal of this analysis is to contribute potentially novel antibiotic-producing soil bacterial species to the Tiny Earth database to help in the discovery of new antibiotics.
    • The Facets Of A Stage Manager: The Intersection Of Relationships And Responsibilities Of A Stage Manager

      Harvey, Michael M.; Lebeau, Cassandra (2022-05-01)
      A stage manager’s job comes with numerous responsibilities that all require a working relationship with so many other positions within production to make everything run smoothly. How do these responsibilities and relationships intersect? This project aims to discover how the responsibilities of a stage manager change according to the relationship to the position they are working with in the present moment. To discover how a stage manager's work may differ between relationships, I will be conducting interviews with different positions and disciplines in a production process, for example, directors, actors, multiple types of designers, props masters and technical directors, to learn what their relationship with a stage manager looks like and what types of responsibilities a stage manager has that pertains to their job. Additionally, a survey will be sent out for theatre professionals across different disciplines to take regarding their experiences in their relationships with stage managers based on their job position, as well as a survey to understand the stage manager’s perspective too. The surveys and interviews will be used to analyze stage manager responsibilities from both their own perspectives and the perspectives of others involved in the theatre making process. The conclusions drawn from the surveys and interviews will aid stage managers in understanding the complexities of their relationships within a production and the ways that their job intersects with those relationships.
    • The First School Shooter: Examining Multiple Causation In A Case Of Mass Murder

      Gow, David; Lowe, Madison (2022-05-01)
      Violence in schools and in public settings is an unfortunately growing problem in modern society, and understanding why and how these crimes happen is an integral part to preventing future occurrences. This thesis is a case study of Charles Whitman, the person recognized as perpetrating the first mass shooting on a college campus. This case study examines multiple causation theory using Charles Whitman’s case as an examine and guide for discussion. Areas of discussion include childhood abuse, drug use, self esteem, brain chemistry, social learning, locus of control, limbic system dysfunction, and cancer. It is argued through the case study that multiple causation theory provides the strongest, most encompassing explanation for why a person may end up committing a violent crime. Connections between sections, relation to the Whitman case, and discussion about how multiple causation theory is applicable to preventing similar cases are discussed.
    • Non-Binary People Don't Owe You Androgyny

      Alves, Brian; Lan, Wendy (2022-05-01)
      Research and study regarding gender and the spectrum is still fairly new. Gender is not definitive between a black and white scale. It’s not all or nothing. Gender exists on a spectrum where gender expression widely varies from person to person. This project reflects from my own experience of being a non-binary person who uses they/them pronouns. More and more studies have been done in recent years surrounding those who identify with being non-binary, non-gender conforming, or genderqueer. The purpose of this project is to examine the visual culture attached to how non-binary people are represented in mainstream media, and how there are both positive and negative outcomes from these representations. While there is more inclusion now more than ever in media and entertainment, the popular aesthetics we see don’t always reflect in every identifying non-binary person. It is also important to note that non-binary aesthetics differ from person to person. How one person chooses to present themselves, may not hold the same truth for another person. The project will be geared towards an epistemology approach with relation to social constructionism. Though my experience does not reflect that of all genderqueer/non-binary people, I know there is truth behind the critique surrounding pop culture and mainstream media and how non-binary people are portrayed. This zine is less of a guide to understanding the non-binary person and more focused on stigmas and stereotypes perpetuated by the visual culture in mass media.
    • How Our Relationships With Ourselves Impact Our Relationships With Others

      Mark, Christopher; Kollman-Veit, Chloe (2022-05-01)
      Out of the many theories as to why and how humans choose their long-term mates, two different models are explored in the present study. Evolutionary models examine the mating strategies used by the two sexes, focusing on the resources each sex can provide to their mate and any subsequent offspring. Alternatively, cognitive models explore the reasons behind a human’s thought processes and potential emotions that contribute to mate choice. Evolutionary models cannot explain all human mating, especially those who cannot reproduce heterosexually. Specifically, the LGBTQ+ community have been historically overlooked regarding these theories. The present study investigated whether human mate preference is most accurately described using a cognitive versus an evolutionary model. It was hypothesized that the mating preference for those who identify as being part of the LGBTQ+ community will be best explained by a cognitive model, while the mating preference of heterosexual participants will be best explained by an evolutionary model. Participants (N=97) were asked to rate certain traits, first for themselves and then for a potential future partner. Results showed that a cognitive model could explain mate preference for both LGBTQ+ and heterosexual individuals [linear regression: df = 1, F = 983.528, p < .0001, R2 = .912] Someone who rated a characteristic in themselves highly would rate that characteristic important in a partner highly as well. Those who recreate this study should try a random sampling method, and further, explore how people’s expression of their sexuality impacts their long-term mate preference.
    • Critique Of The Interpretations And Prospects Of Artificial Intelligence

      Marrero, Danny; Heffner, Rhaea (2022-05-01)
      The field of Artificial Intelligence has had a particular creative and productive period in recent years, drawing attention and further participation in its development from both researchers and business. Artificial Intelligence is said to be making progress on key benchmark tests and researchers are producing impressive and surprising machines. What interests us primarily as philosophers of Artificial intelligence is the interpretive meaning we give to these advances to the field, and whether human level general intelligence could ever be reproduced in a machine. In this paper, there will be a review of the dominant paradigms in the philosophy of artificial intelligence and various critique of their theories of mind and the views of artificial intelligence research and why they fail. There will be a proposal of a better meaning of intelligence and the Lovelace Test of machine intelligence that better encapsulates this meaning of intelligence. Lastly, there will be a demonstration of why serial computers have and will never pass the Lovelace Test and therefore never be intelligent.
    • Understanding The Rise Of Right Wing Populism

      Mulcare, Dan; Kroyak, Paul (2022-05-01)
      The United States, like many countries in the West today, is experiencing a wave of populism. While the populist left in the United States has certainly attracted thousands through the candidacy of Bernie Sanders, the populist right, or more accurately the influence of the populist right, has grown amazingly to the point where two-thirds of self-identified Republicans want Donald Trump to retain political power. More astonishingly, forty four percent of self-identified Republicans want Trump (who will be around seventy-eight) to run for president in 2024. Right-wing populism has been dominating the American political discussion since at least 2016, though the precursors to this movement go back further. This paper will discuss the underlying causes of the recent surge in right wing populism and the intentional strategies that right wing political actors use to both gain and retain support for the populist right in the United States. The rise of right wing populism cannot be attributed to a single person, movement, or event but rather a series of (1) a number of underlying economic plights caused by policies which favor the desires of the billionaire class and corporations (to pursue maximum profit) over working class and middle class people, (2) the economic and political manipulation at the hands of bourgeois political actors (such as the Koch family), and (3) a series of intentional political strategies used by right wing political actors to inspire outrage, garner support, and manipulate the political narrative with a particular interest in undermining traditional sources of authority and promoting nativist rhetoric. Mainly, many people in the United States are unable to live basic lives because of a constraining economic system and legislation which favor imminent and permanent indebtment, disinvestment from public goods, tremendous income inequality through financialization and wage theft, and corporate interests. This inability to live comfortably has caused disillusionment with the government for most Americans and is particularly salient with white men who are feeling the heat of unfettered capitalism in ways that contradict their view of the American exceptionalist framework. This disillusionment coupled with the infiltration of right wing views in the political and cultural views by presenting new sources of legitimate discourse and authority is capitalized on by right wing political actors through scare tactics and nativist/white nationalist rhetoric in order to achieve the political, cultural, and economic power to drive their movement.
    • La Brecha En El Renimiento Academico: Cómo Racismo Afecta A Los Estudiantes Latinx En La Escuela

      Reeds, Kenneth; Harkins, Kaylan (2022-05-01)
      Según el National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), la brecha de rendimiento se refiere a cuando "one group of students outperforms another group and the difference in average scores for the two groups is statistically significant." Los datos del NCES miden únicamente el desempeño de los estudiantes identificando brechas y mostrando tendencias a lo largo del tiempo, "however, a relationship that exists between achievement and another variable does not reveal its underlying cause, which may be influenced by a number of other variables" (NCES). En este estudio, los datos del NCES junto con el contexto histórico ayudan a comprender cómo el sistema de escuelas públicas de Estados Unidos ha llegado a donde está. Las encuestas desde la perspectiva de los maestros actuales que trabajan con estudiantes latinx muestran una imagen de la situación actual en las escuelas y ayudan a comprender hacia dónde deben ir las escuelas a partir de aquí. Esta investigación cierra la brecha entre el tamaño de estas brechas y los sistemas de racismo que las han creado. Esta investigación pone la brecha en el rendimiento académico en un contexto histórico en un intento por comprender la verdad detrás de por qué los estudiantes de minorías, específicamente los estudiantes latinos, se quedan atrás estadísticamente en la escuela. Luego, el estudio sugiere formas de comenzar a cerrar la brecha de una manera significativa que restaure la comunidad dentro de las escuelas y permita a todos los estudiantes la igualdad de oportunidades para aprender y tener éxito.