• Chronological Bibliography of the Works of Catharine Maria Sedgwick

      Damon-Bach, Lucinda; Roepsch, Allison; Homestead, Melissa J. (2002-01-01)
      This two-part bibliography has been built by consulting the Bibliography of American Literature (BAL) and the bibliographies compiled by Sister Mary Michael Welsh ("Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Her Position in the Literature and Thought of Her Time up to 1860," Ph.D. diss., Catholic University of America, 1937) and Richard Ranus Gidez ("A Study of the Works of Catharine Maria Sedgwick," Ph.D. diss., Ohio State University, 1958); library cataloging records; and the personal records of Lucinda Damon-Bach and Melissa J. Homestead. In most cases, entries have been confirmed through books, periodicals, photocopies, or microfilm received through interlibrary loan. We were not able to track down every possible edition (or printing) of each work; foreign editions were especially difficult to acquire. The aim of these two lists is to provide the most comprehensive bibliography to date. We welcome additions and corrections for future editions of this volume. Copyright 2002, Northeastern University Press. Used by permission.
    • The 'Ideal' Climate Change Ph.D. Program

      Drobot, Sheldon D.; Porinchu, David F.; Arzayus, Krisa M.; Barber, Valerie A.; Smith, L. Micaela; Warren, Jeff M.; Delissio, Lisa (2003-01-01)
      The training of the next generation of climate-change researchers is of utmost importance as climate change and its associated impacts take on increasing local, regional, and global relevance. This report seeks to address this issue by highlighting aspects of a successful climate-change Ph.D. program; a program which seeks to balance traditional disciplinary training with exposure to the broader, interdisciplinary climate-change community.
    • Assessing And Addressing Global Warming Impacts On The Culebra Archipelago

      Delissio, Lisa (2008-05-27)
      The climate change outlook for the small Caribbean island of Culebra. The primary text is in English. The supplemental text is translated into Spanish.
    • Analysis Of Rainfall Data From The Island Of Culebra, Puerto Rico Over A Period Spanning 1907-2007 In Light Of Climate Change Predictions

      Delissio, Lisa (2008-10-01)
      Under conditions of human-induced climate change, the Caribbean region is predicted to experience more frequent water shortages. To determine whether rainfall amounts on the island of Culebra have already begun to change, rainfall data spanning 100 years were assessed. Rainfall data had been collected at three different locations during three time periods that did not overlap. There was no evidence of change in annual rainfall amounts or the severity of dry seasons from 1907-2007. It appears that global climate change has not yet affected precipitation on this island, suggesting that current precipitation values represent a baseline that can be used to monitor the hydrologic state of this and climactically similar regions.
    • The Rebirth of Chile in Relation to Childbirth and Female Pain

      Valens, Keja; Carella, Melissa (2013-01-01)
      Chilean novelists Isabel Allende and Diamela Eltit wrote during a time in which Augusto Pinochet’s reign created chaos within the government and suffering for its citizens. In the works The House of the Spirits by Allende and The Fourth World by Eltit, emphasis is placed on the female characters’ inability to have full freedom of speech, and also how the burdens of conceiving a child and giving birth became not just an infliction upon their bodies but upon their existence as women in a disadvantaged society. By analyzing the conceptions, pregnancies, and births of various characters in the novels while referencing how society treated women during Pinochet’s dictatorship, this paper will reveal that childbirth is used as a metaphor for the birth of a new Chile.
    • Bilingual Broadside English/Catalan

      Doll, Kristine (2013-01-01)
      Elegy for Bear #56 - by Kristine Doll translated into Catalan by August Bover: Elegia per a l'ossa #56
    • My Friends

      Doll, Kristine (2013-01-01)
      Poem paired with Adel Gorgy's painting Traces Of Pollock #9 as part of the Cross-Cultural Communications Art And Poetry Series
    • Burgeoning Biraciality: What It Means To Be a Young Mulatto In America Today

      Jaros, Michael; Perkins, Via (2013-05-18)
      In the form of 25 open-ended questions, I interviewed six half-black, half-white Salem State University students to seek their uncensored experiences in defining themselves and their world as biracial people. I endeavored to build upon the little existing literature that focused on the complexities of being "mulatto" - a loaded term in and of itself. Transitioning from a once uncommon, disgraced, and shamed community, half-black, half-white individuals now represent the largest group of biracial people in America, which comes with its own modern challenges and triumphs. In the vein of Lise Funderburg's Black, White, Other, these six narratives weave together a complex tapestry of valuable memories, perspectives, and insights that each of these young mulattos possesses. I share the text of these interviews in conjunction with photographs I shot of each interviewee, which add an intimate visual dimension to each narrative. I also include a personal introduction to the project, which explains the inspiration for my undertaking as a part of my own biracial journey. Furthermore, the thesis reveals the benefits of engaging in curious and honest conversations about race - the ways it helps shed light on America's past, and how it can create more understanding and respect between individuals and groups alike in the present. Along with the thesis, there are 18 additional files, including the text of the six interviews and 2 photographs of each interviewee.
    • Studies in Angle and Shape: Paintings by Matt Curley

      Malloy, Mark; Curley, Matthew (2013-05-18)
      Paintings completed over the course of two semesters serve as the basis for this art exhibition in the Winfisky Gallery at Salem State University’s Ellison Campus Center. Abstract paintings in a variety of media explore visual themes such as landscape and architecture and make up a series of large and small canvases, as well as shaped panels. Each painting’s color palette relates to the natural landscape, but the mostly geometric compositions reflect inspiration found in both geology and architecture. The larger works expand upon ideas established in the smaller, mostly acrylic paintings but use more varied media to create layers of visual information and texture. An artist statement will be displayed alongside the paintings in the gallery. The exhibition will give me an opportunity to present a coherent body of work to the school community.
    • Milan Kundera and the Narrative Self

      Deere, Michael; Sagendorph, Melissa (2013-12-01)
      In my thesis, I looked at several of Milan Kundera's novels to explore the relationship between the self and narratives. Specifically, I was interested in how narrative shapes the perception of our selves, both from internal and external perspectives. Using particular characters and historical contexts from Kundera's novels, I also argue from a non-traditional notion of truth that neither an inner or inhabited self nor a perceived external self can authoritatively claim to be more real or fundamental than the other. I argue that because the two are so intimately connected, even self-perception is impossible independent of a narrative.
    • SSU Water Quality

      MacTaylor, Christine; Asselin, Trisha (2013-12-01)
      The purpose of this research was to see how the water around Salem State University's campus fared with that of national standards. Since water can contain many contaminants such as metals, pesticides, and toxins, it is important to know if standards are being upheld. The metals copper (Cu), iron (Fe), calcium, (Ca), and zinc (Zn) were tested, along with the non-metal fluoride (F). The atomic absorption machine (AA) was used to find the concentration of each metal in parts per million (ppm). A new fluoride ion-selective electrode was used to determine the concentration of the fluoride in ppm in the water samples. The water tested was taken from each residence hall and campus building, and from multiple sources in each building. The main objective was to see if Salem State University's water was up to standards.
    • The Hour to End the SAT I Test in College Admissions

      Aske, Jon; Harling, Angela (2013-12-01)
      Exploration of student performances on the SAT I exam reveal race-based scoring trends. The ability of White students to consistently outperform their Latino counterparts highlights the tests’ racial bias. By using SAT I test scores as criteria to be admitted into universities, educational institutions are acting as promoters of racial inequality. Focusing on themes of the test’s capacity to measure innate intelligence, accommodations being made for ELL students, school funding discrepancies between races, and the ideology of colorblindness, I will show why it is time to reconsider the SAT I exam as a part of the college admissions process
    • Teachers' Views of Inclusion and Social Development: A Comparative Analysis of Practices and Beliefs

      Gonsalves, Joanna; LaValley, Lindsay (2013-12-01)
      This thesis examines teachers' attitudes towards social skill development and beliefs towards inclusion and social integration in their young students with disabilities, while also examining some of their current practices. With the increasing push toward integrating classrooms, it is important to pay attention to how teachers are adapting to having more students with disabilities in their classrooms and how they are approaching developing social skills among their students. Children with special needs can be at a disadvantage because of the decreased amount of attention paid to their socialization. A sample of elementary teachers, special education teachers, administrators and counselors were surveyed to ascertain their views on the topic, including whether teaching social skills is seen as important or not, what age to start teaching social skills, how much room in curricula do teachers have for developing social skills, and their views on the inclusion of special education students in the general education classroom. The main objective of the study was to compare attitudes and beliefs about inclusion and social integration that are held by elementary teachers with those held by special education teachers, administrators and counselors. Differences emerged in the practical application of social skill training strategies, and in the beliefs about when children should receive the most focused social skill training.
    • Rethinking Peer Review in the Age of Digital Humanities

      Risam, Roopika (2014-01-01)
      For academics, double-blind peer review processes remain the gold standard for validating scholarly work. The value accrued by scholarship has traditionally flowed mono-directionally from peer review. In the hierarchies that govern academic hiring and tenure and promotion practices, the single-authored monograph from the distinguished scholarly press sent out for review upon completion occupies a position of prominence. Among shorter forms, the prestigious academic journal provides readily legible markers of academic quality. Yet, for scholars working in digital formats or within digital humanities, conventions governing the gatekeeping of “scholarly” work feel increasingly mismatched to the digital milieu. Therefore, digital scholarship requires consideration of the factors distinguishing it from print scholarship, along with a new approach to validating scholarship that emerges from and respects the specificities of digital work.
    • Mind Changers: Processes of Deliberation and Persuasion in a Civil Retail Discrimination Case

      Evett, Sophia; Sullivan, Cristen (2014-01-01)
      This research seeks to expand on the results of a mock jury civil trial study conducted by Sophia R. Evett, Anne-Marie G. Hakstian, & Liisa A. Burk (2012). In this study, 124 participants were placed on one of 20 juries (10 with black participants and 10 without). All participants were then asked to read a case involving an incident, at a department store. After reading the case, (Harmon vs. Reilly’s Department Store), participants were told that the plaintiff’s claim was either based on racial discrimination or unlawful detention. Deliberation analysis allowed researchers to observe topics used by jurors to persuade other jurors to change their mind from either siding with the plaintiff or the defendant. Results suggest that statements expressing empathy for the plaintiff were more prevalent when jurors found for the plaintiff while statements expressing a lack of empathy were found in juries that sided with the defendant. Statements implying that the case lies on a continuum (statements such as “His actions were not too extreme” or “Some things were right and some things were wrong”) were correlated with a finding for the defendant. Lastly juries that mentioned that the store followed policy were more likely to find for the defendant while statements about the store not following policy did not have an affect on the outcome of the case.
    • English Hours

      Doll, Kristine (2014-01-01)
      Poem originally written in Catalan by August Bover in 1960, translated into English by Kristine Doll in 2014.
    • Is Storytelling Dead?: Finding Walter Benjamin's "Story" in the Modern Fantasy Genre

      Nowka, Scott; Theis, Jeffrey; Young, Stephenie; Clifton, Jeanne (2014-05-01)
      Walter Benjamin in his 1936 essay "The Storyteller" identifies the quintessential elements of a style of writing he terms the story, found in folktales and epics, which he contrasts to the modern novel. While Benjamin believed that this form of narrative was dying out, by looking at the works of Robert Jordan and Patrick Rothfuss this paper will prove that this type of narrative is still in existence today and found frequently in the modern fantasy genre.
    • Whales, Legs, Harpoons, and Other Things: Methodological Fetishism and the Human-Object Relationship in Moby-Dick

      Nowka, Scott; DeFrancis, Theresa; Button, Catherine (2014-05-01)
      This work means to examine Moby-Dick through Bill Brown's use of methodological fetishism and to build upon his argument. The human-object dialectic is explored and flipped, providing a view of the novel in which the objects take precedent and create a collection of quasi-objects that distorts the typical approach of analysis through human action and thought. The objects in the novel act upon the humans in ways of their own - telling stories, taking on different roles, commanding the crew, and creating and destroying their quasi-object human counterparts.
    • Picture This: Representation, Photographs, and the Contemporary American Memoir

      Young, Stephenie; Mulman, Lisa; Caron, Lyndsay (2014-05-01)
      This thesis explores significant issues of representation pertinent to the contemporary American memoir such as "truthfulness," memory, and trauma. It also examines the ways in which individual memoirists encounter and address these issues, especially in regards to the memoirists' incorporation of photographs into their narratives . The central works discussed in this thesis include the following memoirs: Let's Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir (2012) written by Jenny Lawson, Half in Shade: Family, Photography, and Fate (2012) written by Judith Kitchen, and Dorothy Allison's 1996 memoir Two or Three Things I Know For Sure. Chapter one of this thesis focuses on issues of representing one's story "truthfully" and Lawson's use of photographs as "proof' of her hard-to-believe stories in Let's Pretend This Never Happened: (A Mostly True Memoir ) . The next chapter centers on the representation of memory and postmemory, as well as Kitchen's use of photographs in her attempt to revive the past in Half in Shade: Family, Photography, and Fate. The final chapter is concerned with troubles of representing trauma and Allison's use of photographs in Two or Three things I Know For Sure to potentially help her say what she struggles to say with words alone. Throughout this thesis, the ways in which the photographs function as well as to what extent they aid and/or complicate representation is explored in addition to the question of why they are being included in memoir more and more frequently .
    • What She Left Behind and Other Stories

      Flynn, Regina; Kessler, Rod; Young, Stephenie; Merritt, Kayleigh (2014-05-01)
      What She Left Behind & Other Stories is a collection of short stories in which the emotional and mental stability of the characters is explored. In writing these stories, I wanted to know: What happens when someone gives away so much of themselves that there is nothing left? Why do we hand ourselves over to begin with? What is it like to live through the sudden onslaught of a mental disorder? What are the different ways we cope with love? With loss? And above all, I wanted to explore the challenge of narrators who are unreliable because of the way these mental and emotional factors play on their ability to rationalize.