• The Rebirth of Chile in Relation to Childbirth and Female Pain

      Valens, Keja; Carella, Melissa (2013-01-01)
      Chilean novelists Isabel Allende and Diamela Eltit wrote during a time in which Augusto Pinochet’s reign created chaos within the government and suffering for its citizens. In the works The House of the Spirits by Allende and The Fourth World by Eltit, emphasis is placed on the female characters’ inability to have full freedom of speech, and also how the burdens of conceiving a child and giving birth became not just an infliction upon their bodies but upon their existence as women in a disadvantaged society. By analyzing the conceptions, pregnancies, and births of various characters in the novels while referencing how society treated women during Pinochet’s dictatorship, this paper will reveal that childbirth is used as a metaphor for the birth of a new Chile.
    • Burgeoning Biraciality: What It Means To Be a Young Mulatto In America Today

      Jaros, Michael; Perkins, Via (2013-05-18)
      In the form of 25 open-ended questions, I interviewed six half-black, half-white Salem State University students to seek their uncensored experiences in defining themselves and their world as biracial people. I endeavored to build upon the little existing literature that focused on the complexities of being "mulatto" - a loaded term in and of itself. Transitioning from a once uncommon, disgraced, and shamed community, half-black, half-white individuals now represent the largest group of biracial people in America, which comes with its own modern challenges and triumphs. In the vein of Lise Funderburg's Black, White, Other, these six narratives weave together a complex tapestry of valuable memories, perspectives, and insights that each of these young mulattos possesses. I share the text of these interviews in conjunction with photographs I shot of each interviewee, which add an intimate visual dimension to each narrative. I also include a personal introduction to the project, which explains the inspiration for my undertaking as a part of my own biracial journey. Furthermore, the thesis reveals the benefits of engaging in curious and honest conversations about race - the ways it helps shed light on America's past, and how it can create more understanding and respect between individuals and groups alike in the present. Along with the thesis, there are 18 additional files, including the text of the six interviews and 2 photographs of each interviewee.
    • Studies in Angle and Shape: Paintings by Matt Curley

      Malloy, Mark; Curley, Matthew (2013-05-18)
      Paintings completed over the course of two semesters serve as the basis for this art exhibition in the Winfisky Gallery at Salem State University’s Ellison Campus Center. Abstract paintings in a variety of media explore visual themes such as landscape and architecture and make up a series of large and small canvases, as well as shaped panels. Each painting’s color palette relates to the natural landscape, but the mostly geometric compositions reflect inspiration found in both geology and architecture. The larger works expand upon ideas established in the smaller, mostly acrylic paintings but use more varied media to create layers of visual information and texture. An artist statement will be displayed alongside the paintings in the gallery. The exhibition will give me an opportunity to present a coherent body of work to the school community.
    • Correspondence by Serial Killers: A Review

      Kuehnle, Kristen; Sherman, Katie (2013-12-01)
      I will be reviewing characteristics and letters written to other serial killers during the same time frame that Charles Manson's followers were killing for him. The purpose of this review is to determine whether Charles Manson has similar characteristics. The sample will be white males because Charles Manson was Caucasian. This criterion will control for my error margin. White males have committed the majority of serial killings and there is more literature on them than female serial killers or non-white serial killers. This review will be to identify patterns between other serial killer's characteristics and see if they are present in Charles Manson or not. This information will be vital when it comes to my conclusion about whether or not Charles Manson should be considered a serial killer, even though he never performed any of the killings himself.
    • SSU Water Quality

      MacTaylor, Christine; Asselin, Trisha (2013-12-01)
      The purpose of this research was to see how the water around Salem State University's campus fared with that of national standards. Since water can contain many contaminants such as metals, pesticides, and toxins, it is important to know if standards are being upheld. The metals copper (Cu), iron (Fe), calcium, (Ca), and zinc (Zn) were tested, along with the non-metal fluoride (F). The atomic absorption machine (AA) was used to find the concentration of each metal in parts per million (ppm). A new fluoride ion-selective electrode was used to determine the concentration of the fluoride in ppm in the water samples. The water tested was taken from each residence hall and campus building, and from multiple sources in each building. The main objective was to see if Salem State University's water was up to standards.
    • Teachers' Views of Inclusion and Social Development: A Comparative Analysis of Practices and Beliefs

      Gonsalves, Joanna; LaValley, Lindsay (2013-12-01)
      This thesis examines teachers' attitudes towards social skill development and beliefs towards inclusion and social integration in their young students with disabilities, while also examining some of their current practices. With the increasing push toward integrating classrooms, it is important to pay attention to how teachers are adapting to having more students with disabilities in their classrooms and how they are approaching developing social skills among their students. Children with special needs can be at a disadvantage because of the decreased amount of attention paid to their socialization. A sample of elementary teachers, special education teachers, administrators and counselors were surveyed to ascertain their views on the topic, including whether teaching social skills is seen as important or not, what age to start teaching social skills, how much room in curricula do teachers have for developing social skills, and their views on the inclusion of special education students in the general education classroom. The main objective of the study was to compare attitudes and beliefs about inclusion and social integration that are held by elementary teachers with those held by special education teachers, administrators and counselors. Differences emerged in the practical application of social skill training strategies, and in the beliefs about when children should receive the most focused social skill training.
    • The Hour to End the SAT I Test in College Admissions

      Aske, Jon; Harling, Angela (2013-12-01)
      Exploration of student performances on the SAT I exam reveal race-based scoring trends. The ability of White students to consistently outperform their Latino counterparts highlights the tests’ racial bias. By using SAT I test scores as criteria to be admitted into universities, educational institutions are acting as promoters of racial inequality. Focusing on themes of the test’s capacity to measure innate intelligence, accommodations being made for ELL students, school funding discrepancies between races, and the ideology of colorblindness, I will show why it is time to reconsider the SAT I exam as a part of the college admissions process
    • Milan Kundera and the Narrative Self

      Deere, Michael; Sagendorph, Melissa (2013-12-01)
      In my thesis, I looked at several of Milan Kundera's novels to explore the relationship between the self and narratives. Specifically, I was interested in how narrative shapes the perception of our selves, both from internal and external perspectives. Using particular characters and historical contexts from Kundera's novels, I also argue from a non-traditional notion of truth that neither an inner or inhabited self nor a perceived external self can authoritatively claim to be more real or fundamental than the other. I argue that because the two are so intimately connected, even self-perception is impossible independent of a narrative.
    • Mind Changers: Processes of Deliberation and Persuasion in a Civil Retail Discrimination Case

      Evett, Sophia; Sullivan, Cristen (2014-01-01)
      This research seeks to expand on the results of a mock jury civil trial study conducted by Sophia R. Evett, Anne-Marie G. Hakstian, & Liisa A. Burk (2012). In this study, 124 participants were placed on one of 20 juries (10 with black participants and 10 without). All participants were then asked to read a case involving an incident, at a department store. After reading the case, (Harmon vs. Reilly’s Department Store), participants were told that the plaintiff’s claim was either based on racial discrimination or unlawful detention. Deliberation analysis allowed researchers to observe topics used by jurors to persuade other jurors to change their mind from either siding with the plaintiff or the defendant. Results suggest that statements expressing empathy for the plaintiff were more prevalent when jurors found for the plaintiff while statements expressing a lack of empathy were found in juries that sided with the defendant. Statements implying that the case lies on a continuum (statements such as “His actions were not too extreme” or “Some things were right and some things were wrong”) were correlated with a finding for the defendant. Lastly juries that mentioned that the store followed policy were more likely to find for the defendant while statements about the store not following policy did not have an affect on the outcome of the case.
    • Embracing the Female Theatrical Perspective: Directing Sophie Treadwell's "Machinal"

      Sampieri, Peter; Grove, Emily Fay (2014-05-01)
      The whole of this project includes my direction of the fully realized production of the play Machinal by Sophie Treadwell, and the research and analysis that was required in order to mount the show. Dramaturgical research, script analysis, process logs, and the design work of the respective designers are all included elements. The role of the director is to lead and inspire a team of creative individuals in order to help tell the story of the play at hand. it is important that this project occurred because as a female director, it is a rarity to be able to direct a play that has been written by a woman, which focuses on a female protagonist. Please visit the Honors Lounge to experience the full thesis. Materials include: design information, dramaturgy, sound clips, video, and dialogue analysis.
    • A Closer Look at How Children's Choice Book Award Programs Motivate Upper Elementary Students to Read

      Pierce, Michelle; Raynes, Ashley H. (2014-05-17)
      The purpose of my thesis was to learn more about children's choice book award programs such as the Massachusetts Children's Book Award Program (sponsored by SSU). Specifically, I wanted to know what prior research tells us about the impact of children's choice award programs and children's motivation to read, children's reasons for participating in such a program, and children's strategies for selecting books and deciding on a favorite. I completed a review of literature to see what past research has found about the effectiveness of children's choice award programs and their motivation to read. Through a survey completed by seventeen 4th and 5th graders who participated in the 2013-2014 MCBA program, I was able to find answers to support prior research done on the effectiveness of children's choice award programs as well as raise questions for further research.
    • The Disappeared Children of El Salvador's Civil War: The Search for Identity and Truth

      McAndrews, Robert; Frias, Flor (2014-05-17)
      This thesis focuses on the adopted children of El Salvador, who were taken from their parents at a young age and adopted by parents in the United States. This was due to a civil war that happened in El Salvador during the 1970’s. By looking at identity formation, acculturation, attachment theory, and social learning theory, it searches for an understanding of the different psychological effects that these children could have suffered. The book “How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents” is used in this thesis to compare how the Garcia girls and the adopted children from El Salvador both went through similar situations while adapting to their new environments.
    • A Literature Review of the Onset of Social Media and its Effect on HIPPA Violations

      Magazzu, Tammi; Bogosian, Jamie (2014-05-17)
      Social media has become increasingly popular in the United States and is accessed daily. It consists of different websites such as Facebook and Twitter. Access to these websites is easy and fast, allowing users to frequently network. In many situations, social media can be utilized in a positive manner. However, in fields such as nursing, social media can be detrimental. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, HIPAA, provides specific and strict regulations regarding the use of social media in the medical field. Breaching patient confidentiality can jeopardize a nurse’s job and future career. With the onset of social media, HIPAA violations have increased. This thesis will provide a literature review of social media and its onset, and how it affected HIPAA. I will show how these websites have caused more violations of HIPAA, and provide interventions and suggestions to decrease the violations. Specific methods will be included to show how the problem can be fixed. In addition, a brief history of social media will be provided to illustrate how it is extremely prevalent.
    • Sexually Transmitted Infections in the Elderly: Nursing Implications for Prevention and Education

      Leger, Robin; Winslow, Catherine (2014-05-17)
      This study will examine why the elderly population in the United States is at high risk for contracting and spreading sexually transmitted diseases. Through a review of literature, many different risk factors will be identified and discussed. The study will also include methods of prevention to protect this population. Education strategies will also be discussed, not only for the members of the elderly population, but for the health care professionals who treat them. By identifying risk factors, providing education, and learning about prevention, the rate sexually transmitted diseases are being spread will decrease among the elderly population.
    • The Nurses' Role Supporting Quality of Life in School-Aged Children (ages 7-17) with Brain Tumors; Role in Clinic and Support Group

      Leger, Robin; Dunnebier, Nichole (2014-05-17)
      Background: The United States is home to approximately 13,000 Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (PNP), professionals whom are deemed capable of providing care to the growing number of children with chronic illnesses (Dunham, Freed, Lamard, Loveland-Cherry, Martyn, 2010). Some 2,000 children are affected by brain tumors each year and are often cared for by a PNP. They can suffer from affected Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) factors or sequela that the PNP is responsible for addressing. Objective: To gain insight into the PNP’s role in caring for the pediatric patient with a brain tumor and observe how she addressed HRQOL factors and long-term sequela the child is faced with. Methods: An observational descriptive study was conducted. A convenience sample of six children undergoing treatment in clinic and nine children in remission at a support group were observed, specifically appraising the PNP’s role in caring for them. Results: Children seen in both the clinic and the support group experience HRQOL factors, and the PNP addressed them in several different ways. She assessed the children’s signs and symptoms, made plans of care, identified referrals needed, and made them feel as though they had were a part of a group with hope for the future. Conclusion: The PNP plays a pivotal role in caring for children with brain tumors through continuity of care; they are one of the first people to meet the patient and family members, and are responsible to ensure their comfort. PNPs also play the vital role of assessing the patient and identifying the child and family needs, any abnormalities, as well as addressing sequela. Finally, in support group, the PNP is a facilitator for the children’s peer support, reflection on their experiences and promotes hope for their future.
    • Looking Through the Eyes of Primary School Teachers: A Study of How White Teachers Talk About Race

      Leith, Chad; Dunn, Jessica (2014-05-17)
      A study of how White Primary teachers talk about race was conducted. Two different schools districts from Massachusetts were chosen, along with three different teachers from each district that represented a range of different grade levels. One suburban town North of Boston, Massachusetts, was comprised of primarily White students, while one urban city North of Boston, Massachusetts, was primarily composed of a diversified population of students. After conducting a series of interviews with teachers from each representative school district, results were analyzed to conclude two different teaching strategies used by White teachers when talking about race - a proactive teaching approach and a reactive teaching approach. Both of these teaching approaches proved to be important for all teachers to employ in order to be able to respond to their students' questions about race, as well as appropriately plan different lessons and units that highlight this important topic that impacts the lives of students throughout the United States.
    • Communication Techniques Used by Medical and Surgical Nurses to Communicate with Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

      Frost, Marion; Mathieu, Chelsea (2014-05-17)
      Through the process of a literature review and an online survey of medical and surgical nurses currently working in the hospital environment, this study investigates “Techniques Used by Medical and Surgical Nurses to Communicate with Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease.” The literature review covers current research explaining how Alzheimer’s disease affects a person’s ability to verbally communicate and ability to understand verbal communication. The research also covers the most effective communication techniques to utilize when communicating with a person with Alzheimer’s disease. Nurses in the medical and surgical fields have been given an online survey which includes demographic information, scenarios, and various communication techniques that could be implemented when talking to someone with Alzheimer’s disease. The information from the online survey has been analyzed for trends to show if nurses are using the proper techniques when communicating or if they are following the misconceptions. This study contributes to an area of research that is lacking information, as well as explores if medical and surgical nurses are communicating effectively with an ever growing population of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
    • Shameless: An Examination of Addiction and Alcoholism in the Family

      Amato, Phil; Carreiro, Bianca Andrade (2014-05-17)
      The principle objective of this paper is to examine the effects of alcoholism and addiction on the family system through the analysis of a fictional family, the Gallaghers from Shameless. To explore the role of alcoholism and addiction in the family, this paper analyzes the family system through resilience, happiness, and family intervention. Because alcoholism and addiction are stigmatized in the media, people suffering from these two diseases have been dehumanized. The producers of Shameless have the opportunity to create a television series that accurately portrays alcohoism and addiction and the effects it has on families. A realistic depiction of alcoholism and addiction impacts the audience's perception of the two diseases.
    • Parents' Perception of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) and Hope for Their Child Living with Plagiocephaly: A Case Series

      Leger, Robin; Durgin, Gabrielle (2014-05-17)
      Purpose: To examine Positional Plagiocephaly and its relationship to the parents’ perception of the quality of life (QOL) and hope for the future of their child. Study Design and Methods: For the purpose of this honors thesis, a descriptive case series with parent interviews of their experience with infants and toddlers with Positional Plagiocephaly was conducted. In addition, themes from parental postings from a web-based social network for parents of children treated for Positional Plagiocephaly were constructed. Results: A convenience sample of three cases with six parents and themes from the social network were obtained. Two of the case studies were family members and the third case study was a friend of a colleague. Posts made by parents from three pages on a social network were obtained. Consent was obtained prior to the start of the interviews. This project was accepted by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at Salem State University. The student researcher also completed the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (human subject training). This research demonstrated that larger case series are needed to look at the long term effects of this diagnosis. Both qualitative and quantitative studies on the nurse’s role, health- related quality of life (HRQOL), and hope measures need to be conducted. This research may also help nurses and other medical personnel address issues that parents who have a child with Positional Plagiocephaly are concerned about.
    • Effective Instructional Practices in the Inclusive Classroom

      Wiersma, Geertje E.; Gallo, Bianca (2014-05-17)
      The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires that children with disabilities are educated in the "least restrictive environment appropriate” to meet their “unique needs.”-- otherwise known as an inclusive setting. How do teacher attitudes and practices correlate with effective inclusive education? Studies show that if a teacher gives students higher expectations, they are more likely to perform to higher standards. Thus, by giving a student with disabilities the opportunity to be included in a general education classroom, they are usually held to a higher standard. However, whether this motivates or discourages the student is then based on the teacher’s attitude and school’s resources. In this qualitative study, 61 hours were spent observing two second grade classrooms in the same town, but at schools with different demographics. One of the schools contained students primarily from lower socio-economic backgrounds, while the other school contained students who were predominately middle class. Data was recorded in a chart that contained instructional practices in inclusion classrooms. The results show that teacher attitudes and practices differed significantly in the two classrooms observed in that positive teacher attitudes and use of encouraging language, effective socialization, support services, and balanced exposure to flexible grouping strategies—all key factors for effective inclusive education, were much more prominent in one of the two classrooms observed. Future research should be conducted over a greater period of time and in a greater variety of classrooms for more accurate results.